Ward and Hennion Families

 EIGHTH GENERATION DESCENDANTS

of

JASPER CRANE OF CONNECTICUT AND NEW JERSEY

 November 2015

Sanford "Sandy" Wilbur

 The genealogy of Daniel Prince Crane that we have been working on for about 20 years is now finished (for us, anyway; genealogies are never "finished"). If you would like a copy, you can ask for a free PDF download or buy a copy on CD-ROM

   The detailed genealogy starts with Daniel Crane - in the fifth generation of his line in North America. However, we have given details of Daniel Crane's direct ancestors, as well. Below is a draft write-up of one generation of Wards and Hennions; the final version is similar, but may be slightly modified and "improved." 

Even though the genealogy is "complete," we always welcome comments and corrections, and will continue to update the report as new information comes in. 

21. Louisa Augusta Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 25 September 1823 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey [1]. She lived with her parents until her marriage to John James Bleecker on 30 December 1842 at Hanover Neck (now, East Hanover), Morris County [2].

   John Bleecker, son of John Anthony Bleecker and Eveanna Electra Faugeres, was born 20 January 1813 at Whippany, Morris County, New Jersey [3]. His early years were spent in Morris County. He received medical training, but we haven't determined where. He and Louisa lived at Parsippany until 1845 or 1846, then moved to St. Louis, Missouri. Louisa died there 27 October 1847, probably during childbirth. We have not found her burial location.

   On 4 March 1849 in Schuyler County, Illinois, John Bleecker married 2nd Rosanna Bader. Rosanna, daughter of Jeremiah Bader and Sarah Thompson, was born in November 1832 in Preble County, Ohio. She lived there until 1846, when the family relocated to Schuyler County, Illinois [4, 5].

   After their marriage, John and Rosanna Bleecker lived in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, for several years, where John practiced as a physician [6]. About 1855, they returned to Schuyler County, Illinois [7], settling first at Browning [8], then moving to Wayland [9]. It appears that John did not practice medicine while in Schuyler County, instead being occupied as a farmer [8, 9].

   John and Rosanna had six children [5, 10]. Some time between 1870 and 1880, they separated [11].  Rosanna lived for awhile with her brother William Bader and his family at Browning, Illinois [12]. Then, when in the late 1880s [13]. her son John J. Bleecker Jr., moved to Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, she went with him. She lived the rest of her life there, dying in 1921. She was buried at Mountain View Cemetery, Altadena, Los Angeles County, California.

   After their separation, John lived at Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois, and had apparently returned to his medical practice [14]. He soon moved north to Canton, Fulton County, Illinois, where he married 3rd, Sarah Elizabeth (Ashley) Burnap. Sarah, daughter of William A. Ashley and Tinazon Richards, was born 20 August 1832 at Milton, Saratoga County, New York [15, 16, 17]. She married 13 September 1853 - probably in New York State - Joseph Valentine Burnap. Joseph, son of Joseph and Sibyl (___) Burnap, was born in Vermont 29 July 1829 [16, 17].

   Joseph and Sarah Burnap came to Canton in 1856; Joseph died there 25 July 1868, and was buried at the Greenwood Cemetery; Sarah continued to live at Canton with their sons [16, 17,  18].

   John Bleecker died at Canton 18 January 1892 [3]. We have not located his burial site. Sarah continued to live at Canton, dying there 27 March 1918. She was buried at Greenwood Cemetery.

 

Children of John J. Bleecker and Louisa Augusta Hennion:

             95. John Bleecker (born and died ca 1843)

            96. William Hennion Bleecker (11 March 1845 - 19 July 1927)

            97. Infant Bleecker (born and died 1847)   

 

22. Francis Fernando Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 27 January 1826 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey. He died the same year  [1].

 

23. Horatio Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 20 August 1827 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey [1]. He spent his early years in Morris County, and learned the trade of wheelwright from his father.

   In the fall of 1848, Horatio embarked on what was to be a 5,000-mile trip through the upper Midwest [19]. Returning to New Jersey, he worked with his father until October 1849, when he was offered and accepted a position as clerk for his cousin James Harvey Crane at Rock Forge, Virginia (near present-day Morgantown, Monongalia County, West Virginia). Crane was in charge of an iron foundry, reportedly working as an agent for Charles Fox of Cincinnati, Ohio. Horatio worked for Crane for a year and a half, then traveled through the Midwest and South for several years, helping to establish iron foundries and assaying ores. He went as far west as Cincinnati, Ohio, before turning east to Georgia. In 1854, he joined with others in purchasing the Mossy Creek Ironworks in Habersham (a part now in White) County, Georgia, from Andrew Gilmer. On 29 July 1855, Horatio married Gilmer's sister-in-law, Margaret Jane Service.

   Margaret, daughter of James Service and Margaret Wilson, was born 3 April 1837 at London Creek, Cherokee County, South Carolina [20]. Following the death of her father and a brother, and the loss of their house to fire, she and her mother moved to Mossy Creek to live with her sister, Eliza Gilmer.

   Horatio was involved with the iron mill operation for several years, but then rented out his share of the venture and returned to being a wheelwright. By 1860, he had moved his family to Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia, where he continued to make wagons, first in a partnership and later working for a larger company. As secession rhetoric heated up in the South, the pro-Union Horatio moved his family back to Mossy Creek. Secessionists pursued him, and he left Margaret and their family at Mossy Creek, and moved to Cherokee County, North Carolina, where he established another blast furnace. He remained separated from the family for a year, but then returned to Mossy Creek, and with a band of Unionists scrimmaged with Confederates through 1862 and into 1863.

   In April 1863, the Hennions moved once again, back to Cherokee County, North Carolina, where Horatio resumed iron working at the Persimmon Creek forge. His occupation apparently kept him from being drafted into the Confederate Army. With living conditions still difficult, Horatio once again left his family and sought work as a wheelwright with the Northern army at Chattanooga, Tennessee. He did not return to North Carolina until the closing days of the war in the spring of 1865. Later that year, they moved north to Horatio's home country in Morris County, New Jersey, where he lived out the rest of his life.

   Horatio died at Littleton, Morris County, on 18 January 1905. Margaret Jane was living with some of her children at Parsippany in January 1920 [21], then moved with them to Hinsdale, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. She died at Hinsdale 26 June 1923 [22].

  

Children of Horatio Hennion and Margaret Jane Service:

     98. William Norcross Hennion (15 May 1856 – 5 October 1938)

     99. Julian Wilson Hennion (24 February 1858 - 16 March 1940)

   100. Horace Victor Hennion (15 April 1860 - 17 January 1951)

   101. Alice Victoria Hennion (15 December 1861 - 20 December 1938)

   102. Margaret Florence Hennion (27 March 1864 - 30 January 1935)

   103. Ida Blanche Hennion (1 June 1866 - 25 March 1943)

   104. Herbert Arthur Hennion (7 June 1868 - 3 August 1949)

   105. Jennie Elizabeth Hennion (15 April 1871 - 6 March 1924)

   106. Ruby Hennion (1873 - 1873)

   107. Thomas Service Hennion (26 April 1875 - 9 September 1875)

   108. Reginald Service Hennion (20 September 1877 - 2 September 1887)

   109. Pearl Louisa Beatrice Hennion (1 April 1881 - 26 August 1887)

 

24. Lucilla Stanley Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 17 February 1830 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey [1]. She lived in Parsippany throughout her life, where she was a store keeper and postmaster [23, 24]. She never married, but had one child. She died there 27 April 1883, of a cerebral hemmorhage [25]. She was buried in the Vail Cemetery at Parsippany.

 

Child of Lucilla Hennion and Unidentified father:

   110. Augusta Hennion (ca 1856 - 15 December 1869)

 

25 Marietta Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 27 May 1832 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey. She died in infancy [1].

 

26. Luzanna Maria Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 28 August 1833 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey [1]. She never married, and lived with her sisters at Parsippany most of her adult life [23, 24]. In June 1900 she was living in the Job Harris Home for the Aged, Bloomfield, Essex County, New Jersey [26], where she died 31 December 1901. She was buried at the Vail Cemetery, Parsippany.

 

27. William Wallace Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 4 February 1835 at Parsippany, Morris County, New Jersey [1]. He grew up in Morris County, and was employed as a store clerk, salesman, and variety store operator [23, 24].

   On 1 January 1869 at Denville, Morris County, New Jersey, William married Eliza Jane Fairchild. "Jennie," or "Jane," daughter of Jonathan Fairchild and Eliza Dickerson, was born in Hanover Township, Morris County, in 1842. Her mother died soon after her birth, her father remarried, and she was taken to live with her grandparents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Doremus) Dickerson. Daniel Dickerson died when Jennie was four years old, but she continued to live with her grandmother. After her uncle, William Dickerson, married, she lived with him and his wife, Harriet [27].

   Jennie died following the birth of a daughter, 25 March 1870. She was buried at the Denville Cemetery. William did not remarry, but lived the rest of his life in Morris County, with his sisters and later with Harriet Dickerson, his sister-in-law, and his daughter, Harriet, and her family [28]. William died 18 October 1908, and was buried at the Denville Cemetery.

 

Child of William W. Hennion and Eliza J. Fairchild:

    111. Harriet Hennion (25 March 1870 - 1953)

 

28. Francis Victoria Hennion [Julia Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward, was born 26 August 1838 at Parsippany Morris County, New Jersey [1]. "Fanny" lived with her sisters and worked in their store until 26 August 1884, when she married Alanson H. Saunders.

   Alanson, son of George A. Saunders and (probably) Cynthia P. Watrous [29], was born ca 1831 in Middlesex County, Connecticut [30]. He followed his father's profession of ship's carpenter (after 1860, identifying himself as merely "carpenter"). About 1853, he married Aurelia J. Halsey [31]. Aurelia, of unidentified parents, was born on Long Island, Suffolk County, New York, ca 1830 [32]. We know nothing of her early history. She may have been the Aurelia J. Sawyer in the Saunders household in Connecticut in 1850, but we don't know her status there [33].

   Alanson moved his family to Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, by 1855 [31]. They lived at various locations in the New York City area until at least 1880 [34, 35, 36]. Presumably, Aurelia died between 1881 and 1884, either in New York or New Jersey, but we have found no records to confirm that. Alanson and Aurelia had four known children [37].

   By 1882, Alanson was living in Newark, Essex County, New Jersey [38], and it seems likely that this is when he met Fanny Hennion. After their marriage, they lived in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut 1885-1886; Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey 1887-1889; back to Hartford in the early 1890s; then back to New York City 1892 [39]. Alanson died there in July 1895; he was buried in the Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.

   Fanny Hennion was living at Woodcliff, Bergen County, New Jersey, in 1900 [40], and in Morris County, New Jersey, in 1905 [41]. We have not been able to trace her after that.

   Fanny Hennion and Alanson Saunders had no children.

 

29. James H. Salmon [Maria Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of David C. Salmon and Maria Ward, was born ca 1823 in Hanover township, Morris County, New Jersey. By 1836, the family had moved to the Irvington area, Clinton Township, Essex County, New Jersey [42].

  James was a blacksmith by trade. Although records are sparse, it appears that he lived in Essex County all his adult life, primarily at South Orange [43, 44, 45, 46]. Some time before 1860, he married Mary _____ [44]. We found no later records of her, and James was alone, boarding with his step-mother, Sarah (Riggs) Salmon, at the 1870 census [46]. Mary may have died, or they may have separated [47].

   In the early 1870s, James had what were considered at the time maniacal attacks. He was at inmate at the Essex County Asylum for at least three years, and was still considered "insane" in 1880 [48]. We haven't found any records of his death or burial.

   Apparently, he and his wife Mary did not have any surviving children.

 

30. Maria Salmon [Maria Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of David C. Salmon and Maria Ward, was born 13 June 1826 at Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. By 1836, the family had moved to the Irvington area, Clinton Township, Essex County, New Jersey [42].

   On 28 May 1848, Maria married William Duckett. William, son of William Duckett and Catherine Berry, was born in New Jersey, probably in Essex County, on 15 August 1820. We did not discover any information about his youth; in later years, he was a farmer by occupation. 

   William and Maria lived in New Jersey until the mid-1860s, then moved to Addison, Oakland County, Michigan, where they lived the rest of their lives [49, 50, 51]. Maria died there 11 October 1876, with William following 15 November 1896. Both were buried in Oxford Cemetery, Oxford, Oakland County, Michigan.

 

Children of William Duckett and Maria Salmon:

            112. Marietta Duckett (November 1852 - 1922)

            113. Sarah Catherine Duckett (27 January 1861 - 1943)

 

31. Walter S. Salmon [Maria Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of David C. Salmon and Maria Ward, was born ca 1829 in Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. By 1836, the family had moved to the Irvington area, Clinton Township, Essex County, New Jersey [42]. We have not been able to trace him from 1840 to 1860. He appears to be the Walter Salmon who was an inmate in the New Jersey Asylum for the Insane, first in Mercer County and later in Morris County, from at least 1860 to 1880 [52, 53, 54, 55]. He died 25 May 1882 in Hanover Township. We don't know his burial location.

 

32. Unidentified Salmon [Maria Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], child of David C. Salmon and Maria Ward, reportedly burned to death when small [56].

 

33. Harriet Newell Ward [John Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of John B. Ward and Sibyl Burnet, was born 27 August 1825 in Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. She died 16 November 1828, and was buried in the Vail Cemetery, Parsippany, New Jersey.

 

34. Mary Wiley Ward [John Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of John B. Ward and Sibyl Burnet, was born ca 1826 in Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. Some time after 1830, the family moved to Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, where her mother died ca 1834 and her father in 1835. We assume she spent her childhood with other relatives, but haven't discovered who. By 1849, she had married Nathan Baldwin.

   Nathan, of unidentified parents, was born ca 1814, probably in Essex County, New Jersey. He was a shoemaker by trade, and at the time of his marriage was living at Middleville (present-day East Orange), Essex County [57]. The couple continued to live there, and that is where Mary died ca 1857 [58]. She was buried at the Clinton Cemetery, Irvington, Essex County.

   On 28 September 1858 at Irvington, Nathan married 2nd Julia A. Thompson. Julia, of unidentified parents, was born ca 1824 [59] in New Jersey. In 1850, she was censused at Irvington, Essex County, in the household of Alan Orsborn, a shoemaker; no relationship is known [57]. After marriage, Nathan and Julia continued to live in the Newark area [60, 61, 62]. Nathan died there in 1889, and was buried at the Clinton Cemetery. We have been unable to trace Julia after the 1880 Newark census.

 

Children of Nathan Baldwin and Mary W. Ward:

            114. Charles W. Baldwin (20 January 1850 - )

            115. Frederick B. Baldwin (21 July 1854 - )

            116. William A. Baldwin (3 December 1855 - )

            117. Harriet Baldwin (24 February 1857 - )

 

35. John B. Ward [John Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of John B. Ward and Sibyl Burnet, was born ca 1830 in Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. Some time in the early 1830s, the family moved to Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, where his mother died ca 1834 and his father in 1835. We assume he spent his childhood with other relatives, but haven't discovered who. The only certain record we have of him after 1830 is from August 1850, when he was living with his sister Mary (Ward) Baldwin in Clinton Township, Essex County. He was employed as a shoemaker [57].

 

36. Harriet Eliza Ward [John Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of John B. Ward and Sibyl Burnet, was born ca 1832, probably at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. We found no certain records of her life. She is believed to have married John Schureman, then moved to St. Louis, Missouri. If so, she likely died before 1856, but we found no death notices or burial records [63].

 

37. Ashbel Ward [John Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of John B. Ward and Sibyl Burnet, was born and died at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, ca 1834 [56].

 

38. Julia B. Ward [John Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of John B. Ward and Nancy Boals, was born in 1836 at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. She died ca 1842 [56].

 

39. Phebe Maria Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born March 1828 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. Presumably, she lived at home with her parents until just before her marriage ca 1850 to Washington Meeker [64].

   Washington Meeker, son of Abraham P. Meeker and Elizabeth ___ [65], was born ca 1819 in Essex County, New Jersey, probably in or near West Orange, where he lived and farmed his entire life. He died there 15 August 1891. We haven't located his burial site.

   After Washington's death, Phebe continued to live at West Orange with her children. Apparently, she died between 1905 and 1908 [66]. We haven't located her burial site.

 

Children of Washington Meeker and Phebe Ward:

            118. Jane Elizabeth Meeker (1 April 1851 - 15 June 1925)

            119. Ruth C. Meeker (August 1853 - ca 1921)

            120. Lowell M. Meeker (July 1855 - ca 1921)

            122. Nancy Meeker (March 1857 - after 1900)

 

40. William B. Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born 10 February 1830 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. He lived with his family there, working with his father as a wheelwright [67]. At Morristown, on 10 February 1853, he married Phebe Elizabeth Broadwell.

  Phebe, daughter of Stephen Broadwell and Elizabeth Cooper, was born in Morris County in February 1832. Her father died before 1840, and it appears that she, her mother, and Phebe's siblings lived for awhile with her Cooper grandparents [68]. Her mother married 2nd at Morristown on 7 May 1849, James L. Robeson, and Phebe was living with them at the time of her marriage to William Ward [69].

   William died at Morristown 21 February 1860. Phebe continued to live at Morristown, employed with her sister Susan Broadwell as milliners [70]. On 15 June 1865 at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, Phebe married 2nd Thomas F. Willoughby. Thomas, son of William Willoughby and Anna ____, was born ca 1836 in New Brunswick, Canada. We haven't been able to determine when he arrived in the United States. Thomas was a wheelwright, and he, Phebe and her children settled in Newark, and had children of their own.

   Thomas died ca 1879 [71]; Phebe continued to live at Newark until the late 1890s [72]. By 1900, she was living with a number of her children at East Orange, Essex County, New Jersey [73]. She apparently died some time between 1904 and 1910 [74].

   We haven't identified where William Ward, Phebe Broadwell, or Thomas Willoughby were buried.

 

Children of William Ward and Phebe Broadwell:

            123. William Edward Ward (ca 1854 -

            124. Frank P. Ward (11 October 1856 -

            125. Joseph D. Ward (ca 1859 -

 

Children of Thomas Willoughby and Phebe (Broadwell) Ward:

            126. Harry C. Willoughby (ca 1866 -

            127. Maud H. Willoughby (ca 1868 -

            128. Mabel A. Willoughby (ca 1873 -  

 

41. Harriet Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1] reportedly was a daughter of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence [56, 76]. She was born ca 1832, and "died young" [76], probably before 1840 as there was no child in the Ward household at that time of her age.

 

42. Daniel L. Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born ca 1833 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. He was living at home, working as a laborer, in 1850 [69], and was probably the Daniel Ward employed as a laborer in 1860 at Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey [77]. About 1863, he married Julia Ann Van Emberg.

   Julia, daughter of Thomas H. Van Emberg and Emaline Merritt, was born May 1831 in Essex County, probably at Caldwell. She lived with her parents and siblings at Caldwell until her marriage [77, 78].

   Daniel died ca 1866. Julia did not remarry. She lived first with her mother and other relatives in Newark, Essex County [61]; by 1880, she had moved to East Orange, Essex County, where she was living with her sister, Emeline (Van Emberg) Magie, and family [79]. Later, she lived with her son Norman Ward and his family [74]. Apparently, she died ca 1909 [80], but we have found no death reports or cemetery records.

 

Child of Daniel Ward and Julia Van Emberg:

            129. Norman M. Ward (16 August 1864 -

 

43. Eliza Jane Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born ca 1835 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. She lived there with her family until marrying Alfred Johnson on 27 December 1855 [81]. Alfred, son of John Johnson and Abigail ____, was born in New Jersey ca 1914. At the time of his marriage, he was living with his parents and brothers at Morristown, Morris County [69]. He was a farmer and, after they married, he and Eliza Jane continued to farm at Morristown. She died there 22 February 1871; we don't know the cause, or where she was buried. So far, we have been unable to trace Alfred after 1870.

 

Children of Alfred Johnson and Eliza Jane Ward:

            130. James Johnson (ca 1857 -

            131. William Johnson (ca 1864 -

 

44. James A. Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born ca 1837 At Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. He was living with his parents at Schooley's Mountain in 1850 [67], and in 1860 was censused in the Morristown household of Alfred and Eliza (Ward) Johnson, his brother-in-law and sister [70]. We have been unable to find records of him after that date [82].

 

45. Marshall L. Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born in 1840 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. He lived there with his parents and siblings into the late 1850s. By 1860, he was at Hackettstown, Warren County, New Jersey, apparently apprenticing as a stone cutter with Charles S. Down [83]. From September 1862 to June 1863, he served as a corporal in the Union Army - Company H, 31st New Jersey Infantry. His company served as guards for government offices in Washington, D. C., then were moved to Aquia Creek, Virginia, to guard the railroad. They joined with the Army of the Potomac in January 1863, and were involved in fighting at Chancellorville, Virginia, before being mustered out in June 1863 [84].

   On 7 April 1864 Marshall married Mary Eliza Sharp. Mary, daughter of Jacob N. Sharp and Rachel Hoffman, was born in February 1841 in Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey. She lived there with her family until her marriage to Marshall.

   After their marriage, Marshall and Mary lived for awhile at Orange, Essex County [46], but by 1880 had returned to Hackettstown, where Marshall worked making cemetery headstones [85]. Marshall died there 2 September 1892. Mary continued to live at Hackettstown, dying there in 1938. Both were buried there in the Union Cemetery.

 

Children of Marshall Ward and Mary Sharp:

            132. Minnie Ward (18 March 1865 - 1865)

            133. Jessie Ward (April 1866 - 1936)

            134. Ernest Ward (10 January 1869 - 1955)

            135. Harry Ward (1871 -

            136. Warren Ray Ward (28 September 1876 - 1940)

            137. Percy Ward (26 August 1878 - 

 

46. Ellen T. Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born 22 November 1842 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. She lived at home with her parents and siblings until 27 September 1866, when she married at Morristown, Morris County, Aaron Augustus Smith.

   Aaron Smith, son of Caleb Smith and Sarah Garthwaite, was born in Orange, Essex County on 29 March 1822. He was a farmer, still living in Orange when on 7 October 1846, he married Henrietta Gray [86]. Henrietta, daughter of Edwin Gray and Hettie Williams, was born ca 1824 at Orange. She only lived until 2 May 1851 [87]. We haven't determined where she was buried. Apparently, she and Aaron had no children.

   By 1857, Aaron Smith had married 2nd, Mary Ann Coleman [88, 89]. We haven't been able to find out anything about her life. She was alive in Orange, New Jersey, in July 1860 [88], but had apparently died before Aaron married 3rd Ellen Ward in 1866. We don't know her death date or burial location.

   Aaron and Ellen farmed in Washington Township, Morris County [90, 91], and were living there when Ellen died 25 January 1883. Aaron followed on 27 March 1883. Both were buried in Union Cemetery, Hackettstown, Warren County, New Jersey.

 

Child of Aaron Smith and Mary Ann Coleman:

            138. Isaac Newton Smith (15 March 1857 - 1918)

 

Child of Aaron Smith and Ellen Ward:

            139. Carrie May Smith (21 May 1872 - 2 June 1890)

 

47. Thomas Young Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born 2 February 1846 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. He lived with his parents there into the 1860s; may have resided at Dover, Morris County, for awhile [92]; then returned to Schooley's Mountain. There, on 6 October 1870, he married Isabella Beaty.

  Isabella, daughter of Robert Beaty and Mary Ann Taylor, was born in May 1846 in Washington Township, Morris County. She lived with her parents there until her marriage, then she and Thomas continued to reside in the area. Thomas was a marble cutter, and made cemetery monuments and markers.

  Isabella died in Washington Township in 1916. She was buried in Union Cemetery, Hackettstown, Warren County, New Jersey. Thomas continued to live in Morris County until some time after January 1920 [93]; by April 1930, he was in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, living with his son-in-law and daughter, David J. and Anna (Ward) Curran [94]. He died there 19 August 1932 of myocarditis, aggravated by influenza [95]. His body was returned to New Jersey, where he was buried in Union Cemetery at Hackettstown.

 

Children of Thomas Ward and Isabella Beaty:

            140. Herbert Ward (August 1871 - 16 June 1936)

            141. Robert B. Ward (1 January 1873 - 18 September 1948)

            142. Eldridge M. Ward (1874 - 1938)

            143. Walter L. Ward (April 1876

            144. Miriam Ward (December 1881 - 1957)

            145. Anna E. Ward (9 October 1883 - 29 November 1947)

            146. Thomas Raymond Ward (3 October 1886 - 1935)

 

 

48. Martin Ward [Daniel Ward7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Daniel Ward and Nancy Lawrence, was born in October 1848 at Schooley's Mountain, Morris County, New Jersey. He lived with his parents through his youth, working with his father as a wheelwright [90]. By 1880, he was living at Orange, Essex County, New Jersey, employed as a machinist [93]. At East Orange, probably in 1880 [94], he married Henrietta M. Meeker.

   Henrietta, daughter of Edward Meeker and Emma C. Douglas, was born 19 May 1855, in either Essex County or Morris County, New Jersey [95]. She lived with her parents in Morris County, then later (by 1870) at East Orange, Essex County.

   Martin and Henrietta lived at East Orange until at least 1895 [96], but by 1900 had moved to Manhattan, New York County, New York [97]. They remained in Manhattan through 1905, but by 1910 had returned to East Orange [98, 99].

  Martin was employed in a number of different situations, but at least from 1905 to 1910 he was compounding medicines for a pharmaceutical company [98, 99]. Apparently, he died at East Orange some time after April 1910, and by 1913 Henrietta, a widow, was living with their son Maxwell Ward at Gary, Lake County, Indiana. Their other son, Douglas Ward, was also living with his family at Gary [100]. Douglas remained at Gary the rest of his life, but Henrietta and Maxwell  stayed only a year or so. Henrietta was living in San Francisco, San Francisco County, California by September 1918 [101], and was still there in January 1920 [102]. We have not been able to trace her after that date.

   We haven't been able to find death dates or burial locations for either Martin or Henrietta.

 

Children of Martin Ward and Henrietta Meeker:

            147. Douglas Martin Ward (16 March 1881 - ca 1946)

            148. Maxwell Edward Ward (23 July 1882 - 13 April 1923)

            149. Helen D. Ward (November 1888 -

            150. Caroline R. Ward (born and died between1890 and 1900)

 

49. Frances Amanda Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 24 July 1831 at Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia (then, part of Virginia). Amanda (as almost all records identify her) moved with her family ca 1836 to Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. There, ca 1853, she married William O'Hara Scully [103].

   William Scully, son of Denis Scully and Ann O'Hara, was born 12 July 1827 at Pittsburgh. He spent his early years at Pittsburgh; then, in March 1849, he joined with other Pittsburgh men in a trip across the plains to the California Gold Rush. They arrived in the Sacramento Valley in late July 1849, and searched for gold along the American River near Mormon Island. Some of the party returned to Pittsburgh in late 1849, but William stayed in San Francisco, initially working as an inspector for Colonel James Collier, Collector of Customs [104]. Later, he joined with J. J. Southgate and C. H. Barclay and formed J. J. Southgate & Co., "merchandise, produce and ship brokers" operating out of San Francisco. The company advertised in Sacramento and Honolulu newspapers from June 1851 into late 1852 [105]. William returned to Pennsylvania, probably in the winter of 1852-1853 [106].

   Amanda and William lived out the rest of their lives at Pittsburgh. Amanda was one of the incorporators in 1861 of the Shady Side Presbyterian Church [107]. For 30 years, William was freight agent for the Pittsburgh Transfer Company of the Pennsylvania Railroad. He is credited with inventing the "Scully truck," a specialized railroad car useful in low tunnels and for extra high loads. He was the first president of the Fidelity Title and Trust Company (organized in 1886), a director of the Pittsburgh Homeopathic Hospital and the Pittsburgh Free Dispensary, and treasurer of the Monongahela Gas Coal Company [106, 107].

   William died 10 February 1891 of a paralytic stroke, perhaps in part due to a serious skull fracture he had suffered many years previously [106, 108]. Amanda continued to live at Pittsburgh with some of her family, dying there 8 March 1909, of cardiac arrest. Both William and Amanda were buried in the Allegheny Cemetery at Pittsburgh. 

 

Children of William Scully and Amanda Ward:

            151. Charles D. Scully (27 June 1854 - 18 August 1895)

            152. Sallie Scully (17 October 1856 - 11 July 1925)

            153. William W. Scully (3 November 1859 - 21 December 1921)

            154. Frank Ward Scully (November 1863 - 14 December 1863)

            155. George Sherman Scully (2 December 1864 - 31 March 1904)

           

50. Margaret Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 4 October 1833 at Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia (then, part of Virginia). She moved with her family ca 1836 to Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. She lived with them until ca 1854, when she married John Kerr Holmes.

   John Holmes, son of Nathaniel Holmes and Eleanor Kerr, was born in Pittsburgh in April 1822. He lived his life at Pittsburgh, where his father in 1822 had established N. Holmes & Sons, a Pittsburgh bank. John's two brothers, Thomas and Nathaniel, were the "sons" involved with bank operations [109]. Although labeled the "Banker Poet" [110], John seems to have had little to do with the banking operations; benefiting from the family money, he usually labeled himself a "gentleman" [111], and "gave some attention to literature and painting" [109, 110]. His poems appeared in a number of locations, and a small volume of them was published after his death by Margaret [111, 112].

   John Holmes died 17 September 1874 at Pittsburgh, of "asthenia" [111]. He was buried in the Allegheny Cemetery at Pittsburgh. After his death, Margaret shared her house with her sister Mary Ward, her sister Sarah Jane ("Sallie") (Ward) Smith, Sallie's husband Norman, and their two daughters [112]. Sallie died 5 April 1886, and on 22 April 1890, Margaret married 2nd her widowed brother-in-law, Norman Macalester Smith.

   Norman Smith, son of Edward T. Smith and Ann Macalester Bacon, was born 22 December 1841 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was raised in Philadelphia, attended school there and in Burlington, New Jersey, then began work at the Norris Locomotive Works in Philadelphia. On 19 April 1861, with the onset of hostilities in the American Civil War, he volunteered for the Commonwealth of Philadelphia. This was the beginning of a military career that extended through the Civil War years, involving him in many of the key battles of that period, in which he rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He mustered out in 1865, and shortly after settled in Pittsburgh, where he began work with the Pittsburgh Transfer Company of the Pennsylvania Railroad. About 1867, he married Sallie Ward. They continued to live at Pittsburgh. Although out of the Federal Army, Norman kept his military ties by enlisting in the Pennsylvania National Guard, rising to captain of his regiment by the time of Sallie's death.

   After their marriage, Margaret and Norman continued to live at Pittsburgh, where Norman was superintendent of the Pittsburgh Transfer Company. He maintained his membership in the National Guard, and in 1898 served with his regiment during the Spanish-American War. At war's end in November 1898, he resigned. In early June 1902, he suffered a major paralytic stroke; he never recovered, and died at Pittsburgh 28 October 1902 [113, 114].

    Margaret lived out her life in Pittsburgh, sharing her home with her niece/step-daughter Gertrude B. Smith [115, 116]. She died of cardiac arrest on 17 September 1925. She and Norman were both buried at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh.

 

Child of John K. Holmes and Margaret Ward:

            156. Philip L. Holmes (30 July 1855 - 31 October 1874) 

  

51. William W. Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 2 November 1835 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania [103]. He lived with his family at Pittsburgh, probably until his marriage ca 1858 to Jane McCullough White [117].

   Jane, daughter of George R. White and Margaret McCullough, was born at Pittsburgh 12 March 1830. She lived at home with her parents and siblings both before and after her marriage to William [118, 119, 120]; William worked for Jane's father at George R. White & Co., dry goods merchants. He died at Pittsburgh 6 December 1870, of tuberculosis [121], and was buried in the Allegheny Cemetery.

   Jane lived at Pittsburgh with her son, George Ward, at least until 1889 [122]. After that, they moved regularly, apparently as a result of George's profession as a mechanical engineer. We have not been able to trace all their movements, but they were in Manhattan, New York County, New York, in 1900 [123]; at Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts in 1909 [124]; and at Owego, Tioga County, New York, in 1920 [125]. At the latter place, both Jane and George were patients at Glenmary Sanitarium, a private facility specializing in "nervous and mental conditions" [126]. George died in 1921 of pneumonia at a hospital in nearby Sayre, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. Jane was subsequently moved to the Hillsview Sanitarium at North Franklin, Washington County, Pennsylvania, where she died of pneumonia 5 March 1925. She was buried at the Allegheny Cemetery in Pittsburgh.

 

Children of William Ward and Jane White:

            157. George R. Ward (10 March 1859 - 12 January 1921)

            158. Frank B. Ward (11 July 1863 -  )

            159. Sallie Ward (ca 1866 - 21 July 1897)

            160. Unidentified Ward (born and died between 1860 and 1870)

            161. Unidentified Ward (born and died between 1860 and 1870)

 

52. Charles Louis Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 27 February 1838 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania [103]. He lived with his family at Pittsburgh until he was fifteen, then moved to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, where he worked as a clerk for the music publisher D. P. Faulds [127, 128]. He began composing music while still in his 'teens, publishing as early as 1855, and continuing with a variety of songs over the next ten years [129, 130].

   Charles served in the Confederate Army throughout the American Civil War, first as a private in the 9th Kentucky Mounted Infantry, then as chief musician for the 4th Regiment [131, 132]. After the war, ca 1865, he married Katherine Louise Miller.

   "Kate" Miller, daughter of Upton Miller and Elizabeth Elinor Clark, was born in May 1843 in Hinds County, Mississippi [133]. By 1850, the family had moved to McCool, Attala County, Mississippi [134]. Kate appears to have left home by 1860, because she was not recorded in her widowed mother's household then [135], but we haven't determined where she was, or when she arrived in Louisville.

   Charles died at Louisville 25 February 1875, of "consumption" (tuberculosis). He was buried at Cave Hill Cemetery. Kate continued to maintain the family home for their two daughters until their marriages in 1888 and 1889 [136]. After that, she lived with the family of her daughter, Margaret (Ward) Bell at Louisville [137]. She died there 11 July 1901, of apoplexy (a stroke), and was buried at Cave Hill Cemetery.

 

Children of Charles Ward and Katherine Miller:

            162. Margaret H. Ward (November 1866 -

            163. Ermine Palmer Ward (August 1870  - February 1904)

 

           

53. Mary Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 27 April 1840 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. She lived with her parents until their deaths, then with various of her sisters and their families in Allegheny County. She was a school teacher and administrator; she never married. She died 29 December 1928 at North Franklin, Washington County, Pennsylvania, of pneumonia. Burial was at the Allegheny Cemetery at Pittsburgh [103].

              

54. Frank Biddle Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 1 December 1842 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania [103]. He attended school at Pittsburgh, then worked three years as a clerk for Clark & Company, railroad shippers. At the onset of the Civil War, he enlisted for three months with the Union Army, Duquesne Grays, then re-enlisted with the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. He received several promotions, finally to Major.

   On 29 December 1862, at the battle at Stone River, Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee, Frank Ward was shot. He lived until 11 January 1863 before succumbing to his wounds. His brother, William W. Ward, arrived in Tennessee just before Frank died, and accompanied his body back to Pittsburgh [138]. He was buried in Allegheny Cemetery.

           

55. Julia Marie Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 10 May 1845 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania [103]. She lived with her parents there until ca 1866, when she married William Potter Wooldridge.

   William Wooldridge, son of Lawson W. Wooldridge and Jane Benson Jones, was born 8 October 1834 at New Castle, Henry County, Kentucky. His mother died while he was still an infant, and he was taken to live with his mother's Jones family in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania [139]. He grew up in Pittsburgh, and entered the insurance business, which he practiced all his life. He died at Pittsburgh 6 April 1895, of hypertrophy (enlarged heart?) and liver degeneration. He was buried in Homewood Cemetery, Pittsburgh.

   Julia continued to live at Pittsburgh, maintaining the family household for a number of her unmarried sons. By 1910, she was living with her son Frederick and his family. She died there 13 January 1912, of mitral insufficiency (a heart disorder), perhaps originating with rheumatic fever which she suffered some 30 years earlier.

She was also buried in Homewood Cemetery.

 

Children of William Wooldridge and Julia Ward:

            164. Norman Smith Wooldridge (December 1867 - 29 September 1938)

            165. William Scully Wooldridge (ca March 1870 - 11 August 1873)

            166. Hewitt Baldwin Wooldridge (21 June 1872 - 1873)

            167. Louis Rousseau Wooldridge (11 November 1873 - 1913)

            168. Charles Lawson Wooldridge (July 1876 - 1959)

            169. Frederick V. Wooldridge (10 August 1879 - 26 December 1954)

            170. Ward Potter Wooldridge (22 October 1881 - 31 December 1927)

            171. I. N. Wooldridge (born and died ca 1886)

            172. Julian Holmes Wooldridge (11 February 1886 - 27 July 1974)

           

56. Sarah Jane Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born 1 November 1847 at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania [103]. "Sallie" lived at Pittsburgh with her parents until ca 1867, when she married Norman Macalester Smith.

   Norman Smith, son of Edward T. Smith and Ann Macalester Bacon, was born 22 December 1841 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was raised in Philadelphia, attended school there and in Burlington, New Jersey, then began work at the Norris Locomotive Works in Philadelphia. On 19 April 1861, with the onset of hostilities in the American Civil War, he volunteered for the Commonwealth of Philadelphia. This was the beginning of a military career that extended through the Civil War years, involving him in many of the key battles of that period, in which he rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He mustered out in 1865, and shortly after settled in Pittsburgh, where he began work with the Pittsburgh Transfer Company of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

   After their marriage, Sallie and Norman continued to live at Pittsburgh. Although out of the Federal Army, Norman kept his military ties by enlisting in the Pennsylvania National Guard, rising to captain of his regiment by the time of Sallie's death. She died at Pittsburgh 5 April 1886, of "pulmonary phitisis" (tuberculosis), and was buried at Allegheny Cemetery.

   On 22 April 1890, Norman married 2nd his widowed sister-in-law, Margaret (Ward) Holmes. They continued to live at Pittsburgh, where Norman was superintendent of the Pittsburgh Transfer Company. He maintained his membership in the National Guard, and in 1898 served with his regiment during the Spanish-American War. At war's end in November 1898, he resigned. In early June 1902, he suffered a major paralytic stroke; he never recovered, and died at Pittsburgh 28 October 1902 [113, 114].

    Margaret lived out her life in Pittsburgh, sharing her home with her niece/step-daughter Gertrude B. Smith [115, 116]. She died of cardiac arrest on 17 September 1925. She and Norman were both buried at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh.

 

Children of Norman Smith and Sallie Ward:

            173. Gertrude Bacon Smith (17 September 1868 - 28 March 1957)

            174. Jennie Ward Smith (December 1872 - 4 February 1873)

 

56. Clinton V. Ward [William7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of William Ward and Sarah Hughes, was born at Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, after 1850. He died in September 1853, and was buried in Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh.

 

57. Wallace E. Ward [Ralph7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Ralph Ward and Sarah Post, was born 19 May 1831, probably in Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey. By 1833, he had moved with his parents to Newark, Essex County, New Jersey [140], where he spent the rest of his life. He was a coach painter by profession.

   On 30 May 1859, Wallace married Sarah Kinsey. Sarah, daughter of Joel Kinsey and Nancy ____, was born in Essex County in May 1834, and was living in Newark with her parents at the time of her marriage [141]. The couple remained in Newark, and Wallace died there 4 December 1876. We have not found his burial location.

   Sarah maintained a home for their daughter Laura in Newark until Laura's marriage ca 1888 [62]. After that, she lived with Laura and her family at Belleville, Essex County, until her death, apparently between 1910 and 1920 [142]. We have not found her burial site.

 

Child of Wallace Ward and Sarah Kinsey:

            175. Laura B. Ward (ca April 1860 -

             

           

58. Laura Burchan Ward [Ralph7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], daughter of Ralph Ward and Sarah Post, was born 4 March 1833, at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. She lived there with her parents until her father's death in 1842, then with her mother and step-father, Obadiah Hedden, until her marriage 13 June 1854 to Edgar Morgan Platt [143].

   Edgar Platt, son of Thomas Platt and Margaret Elyea, was born at New Rochelle, Westchester County, New York, 31 September 1831. By 1840, the family had moved to Westfield (Staten Island), Richmond County, New York; they were still living there in 1850, where Edgar's father was a farmer and Edgar was working as a hatter [144], and in 1854, when Edgar and Laura were married.

   Shortly after their marriage, Edgar and Laura lived for a time in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania [145], but by 1860 were living in Newark. About 1861, they moved to Medford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, where they lived the rest of their lives, with Edgar continuing to work as a hat manufacturer. Edgar died of a stroke while in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 14 February 1895. He was buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford. After Edgar's death, Laura lived with her daughter Isabella Williams and family, first in Boston [146], then at Natick, Middlesex County, Massachusetts [147]. The Williams family moved once again to Brookline, Norfolk County, Massachusetts [148], where Laura died 13 April 1917, of pneumonia. She was buried by her husband in the Oak Grove Cemetery at Medford.

 

Children of Edgar Platt and Laura Ward:

            176. Lillian W. Platt (2 July 1856 - 6 March 1866)

            177. Frank L. Platt (13 May 1861 - 29 May 1881)

            178. Annie R. Platt (            11 July 1864 - after 1940)

            179. Ada Isabella Platt (19 December 1866 - 1 September 1946)

 

59. Joseph Augustus Ward [Ralph7, Rachel6, Daniel5, Moses4, Azariah3, Azariah2, Jasper1], son of Ralph Ward and Sarah Post, was born 8 June 1835 at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. Augustus (he seems not to have identified himself as  Joseph) lived at home in Newark until at least 1850 [149], but by ca 1858 had moved to Orion, Oakland County, Michigan, and was married to Amanda Struble [150].

   Amanda, daughter of Abram Struble and Maria Ingersoll, was born 20 August 1837, probably at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania [151]. By 1850 [152], perhaps as early as 1846 [153], her family was living in Delaware Township,  Pike County, Pennsylvania. The Strubles left Pike County in 1851 for Oakland County, Michigan [154], which is presumably where she first met Augustus.

   Augustus and Amanda moved from Oakland County to nearby Hadley, Lapeer County, Michigan, some time before 1870, and lived and farmed there most of the rest of their lives [155]. Augustus died at Hadley 9 January 1914; Amanda died at Ortonville, Oakland County, Michigan, 20 July 1917 [156]. Both were buried at the Oakwood-Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Farmington, Michigan.

 

 Children of Augustus Ward and Amanda Struble:

            180. Ida Sarah Ward (1859 - 1928)

            181. Laura B. Ward (1861 - 1933)

            182. Lewis R. Ward (1864 - 1920)

            183. Abram A. Ward (1868 - 1944)

            184. Wallace Ward (1874 - 14 July 1877)

            185. Female Ward (26 June 1876 - 27 June 1876)

            186. Alice A. Ward (9 November 1878 - 11 March 1919)

            187. Eber B. Ward (9 May 1881 - 1952)

 

60. Martha Alice Hedden, daughter of Obadiah Hedden and Sarah (Post) Ward, was born at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, ca 1849. She lived with her parents at Newark at least until July 1870 [61]. We have not been able to trace her after that date.

 

 NOTES

 

1. We have found few original records of the children of William Norcross Hennion and Julia Ward. Unless otherwise noted, the material presented is from the notes of Alice Victoria (Hennion) Dixon (1861-1938), with additional research by Cheryl Hennion Hahn (great-granddaughter of William and Julia [Ward] Hennion).

 

2. Anonymous. 1843. Married (Bleecker-Hennion). Centinel of Freedom (Newark, New Jersey), 10 January 1843.

   "Married at Hanover Neck, N. J. on the 30th December, by the Rev. John Johnson, John J. Bleecker to Louisa Augusta, daughter of Wm. N. Harrison (sic - Hennion), both of Parsippany."

 

3. Anonymous. 1892. Dr. John J. Bleecker, M. D. Rushville Times (Rushville, Illinois), 28 January 1892.

   "Dr. J. J. Bleecker has been a familiar person on the streets of Canton for a number of years, and Monday morning last there was general surprise when the announcement was made that the Doctor had while sitting at the table at the Canton House, just as he had commenced to eat his breakfast, from heart trouble.  To several parties he had complained for a day or two and said he believed he had the grippe.  When attention was directed to the Doctor, Dr. Long, who was seated at another table in the hotel dining room, hastened to him, but could render no assistance, as death was almost instantaneous.  He was aged 78 years, 11 months and 28 days.

  "Dr. Bleecker was born in Whippany, New Jersey, January 20th, 1813.  After coming west he resided for a time in St. Louis.  Also resided at Astoria, in this county, and came to this city from Rushville, and since practiced medicine here.  He was twice married.  His first wife and six children are living, but all at distant homes.

  "His son in St. Louis, H. E. Bleecker, arrived here Tuesday afternoon.  He found the step-sons, A. A. and Edward Burnap, had everything which could be done and made all the arrangements for the funeral, and he left yesterday morning to return to St. Louis.  The body was taken to the residence of his wife, Mrs. S. E. Bleecker, on North Main Street, and the funeral services were held yesterday afternoon in the Christian church, Rev. M. Stevenson officiating."

 

4. Hevlin, J. (editor). 1908. History of Fulton County, Illinois. Chicago, Illinois: Munsell Publishing Company.

   Pages 774-775, biographical sketch of the Bader family.

 

5. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California.

 

6. City directories, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1850-1852.

 

7. John Bleecker Jr. was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in November 1852. Anna Bleecker was born October 1854 in Ohio. Martin C. Bleecker was born 2 November 1856 in Schuyler County, Illinois.

 

8. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Browning, Schuyler County, Illinois.

 

9. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Wayland, Schuyler County, Illinois.

 

10. Children of John Bleecker and Rosanna Bader were: John James Bleecker Jr. (1852-1935); Anna Louise Bleecker (1856-1932); Martin Colebaugh Bleecker (1856-1941); Sarah E. Bleecker (1862-1919); and Harry E. Bleecker (ca 1866- ). According to the 1900 census, there was a sixth child, who apparently died young.

 

11. We did not find a divorce record for John Bleecker and Rosanna Bader, but John remarried soon after their separation. Rosanna continued to identify herself in censuses as Mrs. Bleecker and (after John's death) as his widow.

 

12. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Browning, Schuyler County, Illinois.

 

13. John Bleecker Jr. was in California by 1888, when he was registered to vote. His first wife died in California in Sepember 1889.

 

14. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois.

 

15. Sites on the Internet regularly identify John Bleeker's third wife as Sarah (Hugg) Burnap. Sarah Hugg did indeed marry a Joseph Burnap, but a different one. They lived their early married life in Montgomery County, Illinois, then moved to Washington State, where both died. The two Joseph Burnaps seem to have no close familiar connection, one being born in Ohio and the other in Vermont.

 

16. Anonymous. Undated. Greenwood Cemetery, Canton, Illinois. Cemetery inscriptions of Fulton County, Illinois. Volume 14. Canton, Illinois: Fulton County Historical and Genealogical Society.

 

17. Anonymous. Undated. Murphy-Sedgewick Memorial Home funeral records. Volume 2, January 1, 1918 to December 31, 1940. Canton, Illinois: Fulton County Historical and Genealogical Society. 

 

18. Joseph Burnap and Sarah Ashley had six children: Allen E. Burnap (14 February 1860 - 11 March 1936); Ella L. Burnap (17 November 1861 - 19 October 1864); William M. Burnap 12 (February 1864 -  May 1864); Frank Burnap (born ca 1856, alive in 1870, no later records found); Edwin A. Burnap (4 May 1865 - 30 June 1941); and Joseph V. Burnap (2 July 1867 - 4 July 1867).

 

19. Detailed memoirs from Horatio Hennion (1892) and Margaret (Service) Hennion (1900) have been preserved at the U. S. Army Military History Institute (Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania). A copy of all or part of these "Horatio Hennion Papers" is  reportedly in typescript format  at the White County Public Library (Cleveland, Georgia), prepared by G. M. Glover. We have not examined the original papers, but portions were shared with us by Cheryl Hennion Hahn. Details of the Hennion life while in the South during the Civil War years has been published: Bohannon, K. S. 2004. They had determined to root us out. Pages 97-120 in: J. C. Inscoe and R. C. Kenzer (editors). Enemies of the Country: new perspectives on Unionists in the Civil War South. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press.

 

20. Margaret Service's birthplace is sometimes identified as in Union County, South Carolina, but by her own description she was born in Cherokee County southeast of the community of Gaffney.

 

21. U. S. Federal census 1920 - Hanover township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

22. Berkshire County, Massachusetts, death records: Margaret J. Hennion died in Hinsdale, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, 26 June 1923 – 86 years 2 months, 22 days.

 

23. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Hanover township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

24. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Hanover township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

25. State of New Jersey, Certificate of Death: Lucilla Stanley Hennion - April 1883.

 

26. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Bloomfield, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

27. Details of Eliza Jane Fairchild's early life were supplied to us by Catherine Quinn, from a family history prepared by Eliza Jane's daughter, Harriet (Dickerson) Cox.

 

28. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

29. George A. Saunders, father of Alanson Saunders, is said to have married Cynthia P. Watrous, daughter of Harris Watrous and Clarinda Sawyer, at East Haddon, Middlesex County, Connecticut, on 29 August 1829. Alanson was born in 1830 or 1831. By 1850, George Saunders was married to Harriet ____. George had three children born 1830-1835, then three more 1844-1848. It appears that Cynthia died after 1835, then George married Harriet ca 1843.

 

30. We found no birth record for Alanson Saunders. His parents were married at East Haddon, Middlesex County, Connecticut in 1829. In 1850, the family was living at Chester, Middlesex County, Connecticut.

 

31. Aurelia J. Halsey's name is given on the New York marriage records of three of her children. We found no birth records for her, but Halsey was a well-known name on Long Island, and Aurelia was a name used elsewhere in the family. She may have been the Aurelia J. Sawyer who was found in the 1850 census of the Saunders household at Chester, Middlesex County, Connecticut. Her relationship to the Saunders has not been determined; Alanson Saunders' maternal grandmother was a Sawyer; Aurelia may have been married first to a Sawyer.

 

32. New York State census 1855 - Brooklyn, Kings County, New York.

 

33. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Chester, Middlesex County, Connecticut.

 

34. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Astoria, Queens County, New York.

 

35. New York City directories, 1872-1879.

 

36. U. S. Federal census 1880 - New York, New York County, New York.

 

37. Known children of Alanson Saunders and Aurelia Sawyer: Allen J. Saunders (born ca 1854); Harriet Saunders (born ca 1857); Ernest Saunders (born ca 1859); and Nellie Saunders (born ca 1862).

 

38. Newark, New Jersey, city directory 1882.

 

39. City directories for Hartford, Connecticut; Jersey City, New Jersey; and New York City.

 

40. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey.

 

41. New Jersey state census 1905 - Morris County, New Jersey.

 

42. In the 1830s, Clinton Township comprised what is now principally Irvington and Maplewood, New Jersey.

 

43. City directory for Essex County, New Jersey - 1859.

 

44. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Irvington, Clinton township, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

45. Civil War registration, Essex County, New Jersey - June 1863.

  James H. "Solamon," age 40, born New Jersey; blacksmith; living in South Orange.

 

46. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Orange, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

47. The 1870 census does not include James Salmon's marital status, but in 1880 he is listed as "married." That may be an error, but may also mean that he and his wife Mary had separated.

 

48. Supplemental Schedule, 1880 Federal census - Insane inhabitants in Newark, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

49. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Addison, Oakland County, Michigan.

 

50. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Addison, Oakland County, Michigan.

 

51. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Addison, Oakland County, Michigan.

 

52. U. S. Federal census 1860 - State Lunatic Asylum, Ewing Township, Mercer County, New Jersey.

 

53. U. S. Federal census 1870 - State Lunatic Asylum, Ewing Township, Mercer County, New Jersey.

 

54. U. S. Federal census 1880 - State Asylum for the Insane, Hanover Township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

55. Family records identify Walter Salmon as an "engineer" (see Note 56). The 1880 census and his death record name him a "machinest." 

 

56. Notes of Alice Victoria (Hennion) Dixon (1861-1938), shared with us by Cheryl Hennion Hahn (great-granddaughter of William and Julia [Ward] Hennion).

 

57. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Clinton Township, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

58. Mary (Ward) Baldwin's grave marker has 1855 inscribed as her death year. However, she gave birth to a daughter 24 February 1857. Nathan Baldwin did not marry a second time until September 1858, so there is no chance the daughter was the product of the later marriage. The 1850 census recorded the daughter as three years old, supporting the 1857 birth year.

 

59. There is disagreement among the various records on Julia (Thompson) Baldwin's age. The 1850 census and her 1858 marriage record both suggest a birth year ca 1824; i.e., approximately ten years younger than Nathan Baldwin. However, the 1860 and 1870 censuses give her age the same as Nathan's, and the 1880 census show her as only five years younger than Nathan. The 1824 records appear most likely to be accurate, but we have found no official birth, death or cemetery records to verify that.

 

60. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Irvington, Clinton township, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

61. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Newark, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

62. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Newark, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

63. The notes of Alice (Hennion) Dixon (1861-1938) record Harriet Ward as marrying John Schureman, moving to St. Louis, Missouri, living on Bell Street, and having a child. John Nelson Schureman, son of John M. Schureman and Sarah Apgar, was born in New Jersey ca 1826, and moved to St. Louis sometime between 1850 and 1856. He spent the rest of his life in St. Louis, and lived (at least after 1880) on Bell Avenue. However, in St. Louis on 30 October 1856, he married Elizabeth Coville, who was still alive when John Schureman died in 1905, and was the mother of all his children surviving after 1850.

   If Harriet Ward married this John Schureman (and there don't seem to be any other Schureman possibilities), she must have died between 1850 and 1856. If she and John Schureman had a child, it must have died before the 1860 census.

 

64. We could not locate Phebe Ward in the 1850 census, either in her parents' home or elsewhere. In October 1850, Washington Meeker was recorded in the census as single.

 

65. Apparently, Washington Meeker was married twice, to Elizabeth and later to Susannah. We could not find marriage records for either. Susannah was only 16 years older than Washington at the time of the 1850 census, so presumably Elizabeth was his mother.

 

66. Phebe (Ward) Meeker was listed in West Orange, New Jersey, directories until 1905, but was not recorded in 1908. We have not seen the directories for 1906 and 1907.

 

67. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

68. U. S. Federal census 1840 - Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

69. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

70. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

71. The marriage record of Thomas Willoughby and Phebe (Broadwell) Ward provided the first names of his parents, but we were unable to find any records of them in Canada. Censuses for him and his children identify his birth place as Canada; his death record indicates New Brunswick.

 

72. The death record we found for Thomas Willoughby showed his age, but not the year he died. He was listed in both the 1878 and 1879 Newark, New Jersey, city directories, suggesting he died near the end of that time period.

 

73. Phebe Willoughby was listed in the Newark, New Jersey city directories as late as 1896.

 

74. U. S. Federal census 1900 - East Orange, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

75. Phebe Willoughby was included in the East Orange, New Jersey, city directories until 1904; we could not identify her in the 1910 Federal census.

 

76. Chambers, T. F. 1895. The early Germans of New Jersey: their history, churches and genealogies. Dover, New Jersey: self-published.

 

77. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

78. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

79. U. S. Federal census 1880 - East Orange, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

80. Julia Ward was listed in the Orange, New Jersey, city directories until 1908. We could not find her in the 1910 Federal census.

 

81. The marriage records of David M. James include a citation for 27 December 1855, marrying Alfred Johnson of Morristown and Mary Jane Ward of Springtown. However, the "Mary" was clearly added at another time; all other particulars fit Eliza Jane Ward.

 

82. Various internet "family trees" give James Ward's death as occurring in 1864. That may be true, but we were unable to find any documentation of the event.

 

83. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Hackettstown, Warren County, New Jersey.

 

84. Office of the Adjutant General. 1876. Record of officers and men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Trenton, New Jersey: John L. Murphy.

 

85. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Hackettstown, Warren County, New Jersey.

 

86. Anonymous. 1846. Married - Smith-Gray. Newark Daily Advertiser (Newark,

New Jersey), 8 October 1846.

   "Married... On the 7th inst., by the Rev. Mr. White, Aaron Smith and Henrietta Gray, all of Orange."

 

87. Anonymous. 1851. Died - Henrietta Smith. Newark Daily Advertiser (Newark, New Jersey), 3 May 1851.

   "Died... at Orange, on the 2d inst., Henrietta, wife of Aaron A. Smith, in the 27th year of her age. Funeral tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon, at 3 1/2 o'clock."

 

88. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Orange Township, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

89. Anonymous. 1898. Biographical and genealogical history of the city of Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. New York, New York: Lewis Publishing Company.

  Page 163: "Caleb Smith, son of Samuel and Eunice (Baldwin) Smith, was born in July, 1778, and married Sarah Garthwaite, who was born October 27, 1787, and who died October 26, 1847. The lived on Scotland street [Newark], occupying the southern half of the old homestead farm. Besides devoting himself to agricultural pursuits Caleb Smith carried on a successful enterprise in the manufacturing of harness and horse collars. He died March 16, 1866, at the age of eighty-seven years. Of his children... Aaron Augustus was thrice married, first to Henrietta Gray, secondly to Mary A. Coleman, and thirdly to a Miss Ward.."

 

90. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

91. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey.

 

92. In the 1870 census, Thomas Ward was recorded in the household of Westley Kleboth, Dover, Morris County, New Jersey. Mr. Kleboth was a carpenter; Thomas Ward was listed as a marble cutter.

 

93. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Orange, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

94. In the New Jersey marriage records compiled by the Mormon Church, Martin Ward and Henrietta Meeker are listed as having married at East Orange, New Jersey, 15 June 1879. However, the June 1880 Federal census recorded both as single, with Henrietta living with her parents. As their first child was born 16 March 1881, a marriage date in June 1880 seems more likely.

 

95. In the 1900 Federal census, Henrietta (Meeker) Ward was recorded as having been born in May 1858. However, most censuses agree with a date ca 1855, as recorded in these publications:

   (1) Douglas, C. H. J. 1879. A collection of family records with biographical sketches, and other memoranda of various families and individuals bearing the name Douglas. Providence, Rhode Island: E. L. Freeman & Co.

  P. 427: Emma Caroline Douglas born 4 December 1831; married 17 August 1854 to Edward Meeker of Orange, New Jersey; children listed, including Henrietta May Meeker born 19 May 1855.

 

   (2) Anonymous. 1898. Biographical and genealogical history of the city of Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. New York, New York: Lewis Publishing Company.

   Pages 118-119: "Edward Meeker, youngest child of Denman and Mary (Maxwell) Meeker, was born at Succasunna Plains, Morris county, New Jersey, September 27, 1830, and received such educational advantages as the place of his birth afforded. After serving an apprenticeship to the carpenter trade, at Newark, he, in 1853, began contracting for the erection of buildings at Newark and Orange. In 1865 he removed his business entirely to East Orange, and availing himself of the wider opportunities offering, (for the great development of the Oranges dates from about that time), he engaged actively in the purchase and improvement of real estate, in addition to his former business of contracting... "

   "In 1854 Mr. Meeker married Emma Caroline, daughter of Nathaniel Douglas, of Hanover, New Jersey. The children of this marriage are: Henrietta M., now Mrs. M. P. Ward; Anne Maxwell; Edward C., who married Lorena, daughter of Stephen B. Colgate; Helen Douglas, and Arthur Denman."

 

 96. New Jersey State census 1895 - East Orange, Essex County.

 

97. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Manhattan, New York County, New York.

 

98. New York State census 1905 - Manhattan, New York County.

 

99. U. S. Federal census 1910 - East Orange, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

100. Gary, Indiana, city directory 1913.

 

101. On Maxwell Ward's 1918 military registration card, his mother Henrietta Ward is given as his closest relative, living in San Francisco, California.

 

102. U. S. Federal census 1920 - San Francisco, San Francisco County, California.

 

103. If particular sources are not cited for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, birth and death records, the information was derived from church records, death certificates, compiled birth reports (a few), and/or cemetery records. Birth years have sometimes been estimated from censuses. There are very few formal marriage records; we have estimated some marriage years based on the birth of a first child. Federal and state censuses have been used to identify locations where people lived, and the years they lived at each location.

 

104. The overland trip to California participated in by William Scully is described by another party member, in: Johnston, W. G. 1893. Experiences of a Forty-niner. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Privately printed.

 

105. Southgate, J. J., C. H. Barclay, and W. O. H. Scully. 1851. Advertisement: J. J. Southgate & Co. Sacramento Daily Union (Sacramento, California), 24 June 1851.

   The same ad ran in Sacramento and Honolulu, Hawaii, newspapers from mid-1851 through late 1852.

 

106. Anonymous. 1891. Obituary: Scully. The Engineering and Mining Journal 51(7):212.

   "William O'Hara Scully, treasurer of the Monongahela Gas Coal Company, died on the 10th inst. at Pittsburgh, Pa., aged 60 years. He was an Argonaut of '49, but returned to Pittsburgh in 1852, and for 30 years was identified with the Pennsylvania Railroad. He was the inventor of the 'Scully truck,' for use in low tunnels and for transportation of machinery or plates higher than the box car. Mr. Scully was formerly president of the Fidelity Title and Trust Company, a director of the Homeopathic Hospital and of the Pittsburgh Free Dispensary, and had long been a promoter of philanthropic enterprises."

 

107. Killikelly, S. H. 1906. History of Pittsburgh, its rise and progress. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: B. C. & Gordon Montgomery Co.

   Page 226: "The Fidelity Title and Trust Company, organized in 1886, with William O. H. Scully as the first president and James T. Armstrong, secretary and treasurer. Its capital was increased to $2,000,000 in 1893."

   Pp. 370-372, East Liberty Presbyterian Church incorporated in 1847, gave rise to the Shady Side Presybterian Church in 1861; Amanda Scully one of incorporators.

 

108. Anonymous. 1891. William O'H. Scully dead. Pittsburgh Dispatch (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), 11 February 1891.

  "William O'Hara Scully, brother of John D. Scully, of the First National Bank, died early yesterday morning at the age of 64 years. In 1863, while Mr. Scully was associated with the Pittsburgh transfer of the Pennsylvania road, he was personally superintending the loading of a number of guns which were urgently needed by the Government. The chain on one of the derricks broke and struck him on the head back of the ear, fracturing his skull. Mr. Scully was laid up for six months before he returned to work, and ever since then he has been troubled more or less by the wound. The immediate cause of his death was paralysis, which resulted from the breaking out anew of the trouble in his head by the formation of a clot on the brain."

 

109. Anonymous. 1889. History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Part II.

Chicago, Illinois: A. Warner & Co.

   Page 264: "Nathaniel Holmes, founder of the banking house of N. Holmes & Sons, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, in March 1782. He married Eleanor Kerr, who was reared in the same locality, and together they came to Pittsburgh in 1807. After engaging in mercantile pursuits Mr. Holmes, in 1822, bought out an exchange broker named Gilmore, and continued to transact a banking business until is death in 1849; his wife died two years previously. They had three sons  -- Thomas Ridgway, Nathaniel and John Kerr; and two daughters -- Mary (wife of W. W. Wallace), who died before her father, and Jane (widow of W. B. Pusey), who is still living. The two eldest sons became his associates in business, but the first retired in 1857, and died soon after without issue. John K. gave some attention to literature and painting; he died in 1874, leaving no offspring."

 

110. Anonymous. 1853. A wealthy poet! Washington Reporter (Washington, Pennsylvania), 9 March 1853.

   "John K. Holmes, the Banker Poet of Pittsburgh, Pa., is said to be worth One Hundred Thousand Dollars! Lucky that, for a lover of literature. No wonder the Muses court such a prize."

 

111. Among John Holmes' poems we found in print were: Days Gone By (Newport [Rhode Island] Mercury, 12 February 1848; On a Miser (Washington [Pennsylvania] Reporter, 4 March 1868); A Summer Thought (The Knickerbocker 36[1]:25, July 1850). A tribute to General Alexander Hays, "one of the earliest poems in the dead general's honor," is included in: Fleming, G. T., and G. A. Hays. 1919. Life and letters of Alexander Hays. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: privately printed.

 

112. After John Holmes' death, his widow Margaret had published a selection of his poetry as "Echoes of Auld Lang Syne" (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Reed & Whitney). In 1949, Gertrude B. Smith gave a copy to what is now the Senator John Heinz History Center, Pittsburgh.

 

113. Anonymous. 1902. Near Death's door. Daily Republican (Monongahela, Pennsylvania), 27 August 1902.

   "Colonel Norman M. Smith, one of the best known military men in this end of the state, is lying in the most critical condition at his home, Pittsburgh, and very slight hopes are entertained for his recovery. At three o'clock Tuesday afternoon it was stated at his home that the colonel is very low and his death might be expected at any time within the next twenty-four hours. He is suffering from a stroke of paralysis received about two  months ago.

  "Colonel Smith is known from one end of the state to the other as being a military man of exceptional qualities. For a long time he was commander of the Eighteenth regiment of the National Guard of Pennsylvania.

   "Colonel Smith enlisted in the Commonwealth artillery, which was organized at Philadelphia, April 18, 1861. He was breveted a major and lieutenant colonel in March 1865, and mustered out of the service May 31, 1865. He was mustered in a colonel of the Eighteenth Pennsylvania volunteers April 27, 1898, at Mt. Gretna, and served as such with great credit throughout the Spanish war. He resigned from the National Guard in November 1898, and was succeeded by Colonel Frank I. Rutledge.

   "Colonel Smith was wounded at Franklin, Tenn. He was in 23 battles in the Civil war. He was at Antietam, Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga and other famous engagements." 

 

114. Anonymous. 1903. Obituary - Colonel Norman Macalester Smith. Annual Proceedings, Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

   Pages 43-44: "Colonel Norman Macalester Smith died at Pittsburgh, Penna., October 28, 1902. He was born in Philadelphia, December 22, 1841, the son of Edward T. and Ann Macalester (Bacon) Smith. Until his sixteenth year he was educated in his native city and in Burlington, N. J. He then entered the Norris Locomotive Works, for the purpose of learning practical mechanical engineering, which was frustrated by the opening of the Civil War. He volunteered on the nineteenth of April, 1861, in the Commonwealth Artillery of Philadelphia, in which he served for three months at Fort Delaware. On being mustered out he was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Fifty-eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, but declined the position, enlisting instead as private in the Anderson Troop of Pennsylvania Cavalry on the fifteenth of October, and serving in it until September, 1862, having in the meantime participated in the battles of Shiloh and Corinth."

   "In June, 1862, he was ordered to Pennsylvania to recruit for the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, in which he was commissioned Captain, October 1, 1862. In this capacity he participated in the battles of Antietam and Williamsport, Maryland; and in Triune, Wilkinson's Cross Roads, Stone River, Lavergne, and Woodbury, Tennessee. In May, 1863, he resigned and entered the Nineteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, serving first as Quartermaster, afterward as First-Lieutenant and Adjutant, and finally as Captain, participating in the actions at Okaloona and Ivy Farm, Mississippi; Cypress Swamp, Tennessee; Gun Town, Black River, Utica, Port Gibson and Grand Gulf, Mississippi; Marion, Arkansas; Nashville, Hollow Tree Gap, Franklin, and Anthony's Hill, Tennessee, and Sugar Creek, Alabama. During the summer of 1864 he served as Inspector and Assistant Adjutant-General of the First Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of West Tennessee... He was subsequently brevetted Major, United States Volunteers, March 13, 1865, 'for distinguished gallantry in the battle of Hollow Tree Gap, Tenn., December 17, 1864;' and 'Lieutenant -Colonel, March 13, 1865, for distinguished gallantry in the battles of Anthony's Hill and Sugar Creek, Tenn.'"

   "At the close of the war Colonel Smith entered the service of the State as a Guardsman, being elected Captain in the Eighteenth Infantry, and later was elected Major. In 1883 he was made Lieutenant-Colonel, and on September 30, 1884, was elected Colonel of the regiment. When the regiment was mustered into service during the Spanish-American War he was in command, but retired after the regiment was mustered out."

 

115. U. S. Federal census 1910 - Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

 

116. U. S. Federal census 1920 - Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

 

117. We could not find a record for the marriage of William A. Ward and Jane McC. White. Their first child was born in March 1859, suggesting a marriage in 1858.

 

118. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

 

119. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

 

120. U. S. Federal census 1870 - Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

 

121. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, death records.

 

122. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, city directories.

 

123. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Manhattan, New York County, New York.

 

124. Springfield, Massachusetts, city directory 1909.

 

125. U. S. Federal census 1920 - Owego, Tioga County, New York.

 

126. Pages 270-271, in: H. M. Hurd et al. 1916. The institutional care of the insane in the United States and Canada. Volume III. Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins Press.

 

127. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

 

128. Bush, B. 2014. According to D. F. Faulds... Louisville's Hays, not Ohio's Emmett, wrote lyrics to South's national anthem, "Dixie." The Kentucky Civil War Bugle (on-line magazine), Volume 8, Issue 4.

   "(D. F. Faults) stated that Charlie Ward entered his office at the age of 15 in 1854 and was a clerk in his publishing business and slept in the music store."

 

129. The WorldCat library database has the following list of the most widely-held works by Charles L. Ward:

   My Natal Home: 3 editions published in 1974 in English, and held by 31 libraries worldwide.

   I'm Coming to my Dixie Home: 3 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 30 libraries worldwide.

   Gen. Breckenridge's Grand Waltz dedicated to the Fifth Kentucky Regiment:

1 edition published in 1862 and held by 29 libraries worldwide.

   Think of Your Head in the Morning (comic song): 2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 29 libraries worldwide

   I'm Coming Home to Dixie: 1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 28 libraries worldwide

   Why do I Love Thee (as sung by Miss Caroline Richings): 2 editions published in 1860 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide

   Gentle Jenny Gray: 3 editions published in 1856 and held by 5 libraries worldwide

   The Faded Gray Jacket, or, Fold it up Carefully: 1 edition published in 1866 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide

   The Old Play Ground: 2 editions published in 1855 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide

   The New Play Ground: 1 edition published in 1857 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide

 

130. There is some evidence that Charles Ward was involved in writing one of the early versions of the popular song, "Dixie." The publisher D. F. Faulds is said to have received sheet music for the song a year before the well-known Ohio version was published. William S. Hays wrote the words and Charles Ward adapted the tune from an old Southern folk song. Both Hays and Ward were employees of Faulds at the time. (See the article cited in Note 128 for more information.)

 

131. Walden, G. R. 2008. Remembering Kentucky's Confederates. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing.

    "The Kentucky Battle Song," written in 1861 by Charles L. Ward, "chief musician of the 4th Kentucky Infantry. The song was popular in the Orphan Brigade recruiting camps that were established just across the state line in Tennessee because it celebrated the soldiers' desire to return to Kentucky and turn it into a Confederate state."

 

132. Thompson, E. P. 1898. History of the Orphan Brigade. Louisville, Kentucky: Lewis N. Thompson.

   Pages 646: "Charles L. Ward, Louisville, fought at Shiloh with the Ninth Regiment; was transferred, 1862, to this company (the Fourth), and appointed chief musician of the regiment. He served with the band the remainder of the war."

 

133. We did not find a birth record for Kate Miller, but her family was recorded in Hinds County, Mississippi, in both the 1840 Federal census and the 1845 Mississippi State census.

 

134. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Attala County, Mississippi.

 

135. U. S. Federal census 1860 - French Camp, Choctaw County, Mississippi.

 

136. U. S. Federal census 1880 - Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

 

137. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

 

138. A biographical sketch of Frank Biddle Ward's life, as well as a narrative of his brother's trip from Pennsylvania to Tennessee to retrieve his body, is included in:

   Ward, W. W. 1906. Will Ward's hunt for his brother, the Major. Pages 154-177 in C. H. Kirk (editor), History of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Society of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

 

139. Page 824 in: Wooldridge, W. C. 2002. The Wooldridge family: Wooldridge-surname descendants to ca 1900 of John Wooldridge (ca 1678-1757), blacksmith of Henrico and Chesterfield counties, Virginia. Volume 2. Fredericksburg, Virginia: Sheridan Books.

 

140. Laura B. Ward, sister of Wallace Ward, was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1833.

 

141. U. S. Federal census 1860 - Newark, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

142. Sarah (Kinsey) Ward was enumerated in the 1910 Federal census for Belleville, Essex County, New Jersey, but we could not identify her in the 1920 census for Belleville, or elsewhere.

 

143. Anonymous. 1854. Married (Platt-Ward). Daily Newark Advertiser (Newark, New Jersey), 16 June 1854.

   "Married, in New York, on the 13th inst., by the Rev. Wm. S. Balch, Edgar M. Platt, of Staten Island, to Laura B. Ward, of this city [Newark]."

 

144. The residences of Edgar Platt, both before and after his marriage to Laura Ward, were identified from the census records for New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts, from city directories, and from the birth and death records of their children and themselves.

 

145. Lillian Platt, daughter of Edgar Platt and Laura Ward, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in July 1856.

 

146. U. S. Federal census 1900 - Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

 

147. U. S. Federal census 1910 - Natick, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

 

148. U. S. Federal census 1920 - Brookline, Norfolk County, Massachusetts.

 

149. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Newark, Essex County, New Jersey.

 

150. We have not found any specific records for Augustus Ward between 1850 and 1860. The 1860 Federal census for Orion, Oakland County, Michigan, recorded Augustus with his wife, Amanda, and a 10-month old daughter born in Michigan.

 

151. None of the records we found of Amanda Struble's birthplace are more specific than "Pennsylvania," but the 1840 Federal census shows the family at Easton, Pennsylvania.

 

152. U. S. Federal census 1850 - Delaware Township, Pike County, Pennsylvania.

 

153. The Struble family reportedly arrived in Pike County, Pennsylvania, in 1846 (Note 154, below), but Sidney Struble's birth in January 1847 has been identified (no record found by us) as occurring at Easton, Pennsylvania, like his sister Amanda's.

 

154. Anonymous. 1884. History of Lapeer County, Michigan. Chicago, Illinois: H. R. Page & Co.

   Pp. 152-153, biographical note on the brother of Amanda (Struble) Ward: "Lewis Y. Struble was born in Sussex County, New Jersey, in 1831. Moved with his parents to Pike County, Pennsylvania, in 1846. From thence he moved to Oakland County, Michigan, in 1851, and to Lapeer County in 1868... His father, Abram, was born in Sussex County,  New Jersey, 1808, married in 1828, and died in 1872. His mother, Maria Ingersoll, born in 1809, still living."

 

155. U. S. Federal censuses 1870 to 1900 show Augustus and Amanda Ward living at Hadley, Lapeer County, Michigan; in 1910, they were recorded at Oxford, Oakland County, Michigan. The death certificate for Augustus has his death in 1914 as occurring at Hadley.

 

156. Laura (Ward) Shetler, daughter of Augustus and Amanda Ward, was living with her husband at Ortonville, Michigan, at the time of Amanda's death. It seems likely Amanda was living with them then.

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