The Loyalist Simon Kollock in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia -Part Three

Compiled by Sanford "Sandy" Wilbur

November 2018


CHAPTER THREE

FIFTH GENERATION IN NORTH AMERICA

5. Charles Perry Kollock [Simon4, Shepherd3, Simon2, Jacob1], son of Simon Kollock and Catherine Perry, was born at Lewes, Sussex County, Delaware, on 21 August 1766, and died there 22 October 1766 [1]. I could not find his burial location.

 6. Jacob Kollock [Simon4, Shepherd3, Simon2, Jacob1], son of Simon Kollock and Anne Catherine Burton, was born ca 1769, in Sussex County, Delaware, probably at Lewes. Shortly after his father joined the British Army in 1776, the family moved to the safety (for Loyalists) of New York City. He was only about 13 (too young to legally join the army) when in March 1782, he enlisted as a volunteer in the Loyal American Regiment. I could not find any record of service he might have provided.

   On 26 June 1778, the Delaware Legislature passed the Act of Free Pardon and Oblivion, giving the chance for most citizens who had sided with the British to swear loyalty to the new government. This offer was not made to anyone who had actively waged war against the rebels. Simon Kollock was on the list of unpardonables [2]. Being an outlaw in the new country, Simon and family had to join with other Loyalists who the British Government transferred to Canada in the summer of 1783. Members of the Loyal American Regiment were granted Crown lands in New Brunswick's Saint John River valley.

   The Kollocks lived in or near Fredericton, New Brunswick, then in 1785 Simon petitioned for land in the northern part of the Miramichi River valley for himself, his sons, and others [3]. By 1786, they were established at Bay du Vin, Northumberland County [4]. Jacob lived with his father at first, but in 1788 petitioned for land of his own. The petition was denied, as the land he wanted was already reserved for someone else [5]. He tried again in 1780, with his brother Joseph and Thomas Iann, and this time he was granted 200 acres at Bay du Vin [6].

   On 20 February 1790 at Bay du Vin, Jacob married Miriam Horton. Miriam, daughter of James Horton and Ann? ____, was born ca 1771 at Rye, Westchester County, New York. Her father, James, served with the British against the rebels in the American Revolution, and the family was forced to leave the country after the war. They went first to Shelburne, Nova Scotia, ca 1782, then moved to Bay du Vin in 1785, where James became one of Northumberland County's magistrates [7].

   Some time between 1795 and 1805, Jacob and Miriam moved from Bay du Vin to Kouchibouguac [8][9]. Jacob was supervisor of roads for the parish [10]. During the War of 1812, he was made Major Commandant of the 2nd Battalion, Northumberland County Regiment, a title he used through his life. Most of his life after 1803 was spent at Kouchibouguac [11][12].

   By 1841, Jacob was "totally blind and in the most indigent circumstances." From then until at least 1856, he received a small government stipend, as a result of his military service [13]. they may have been living with their son Joseph Kollock during some of this period. Miriam probably died in 1851 [14], and Jacob did spend his final years in Joseph's household [15]. He died some time after 1861. I couldn't find a death record, nor could I find cemetery locations for either Jacob or Miriam.

 Children of Jacob Kollock and Miriam Horton:

             10. James Kollock (ca 1791 -

            11. Mary Eliza Kollock (1792 - )

            12. Shepard Franklin Kollock (28 February 1793 - 1843)

            13. George Kollock (ca 1794 - )

            14. Anne Elizabeth Kollock (1795 - 1886)

            15. Joseph Kollock (ca 1800 - )

            16. Catherine Kollock (ca 1805 - )

 7. Joseph Kollock [Simon4, Shepherd3, Simon2, Jacob1], son of Simon Kollock and Anne Catherine Burton, was born about 1771, in Sussex Co., Delaware, probably at Lewes. Shortly after his father joined the British Army in 1776, the family moved to the safety (for Loyalists) of New York City. He was only about 11 (far too young to legally join the army) when in March 1782, he enlisted as a volunteer in the Loyal American Regiment. I could not find any record of service he might have provided.

   On 26 June 1778, the Delaware Legislature passed the Act of Free Pardon and Oblivion, giving the chance for most citizens who had sided with the British to swear loyalty to the new government. This offer was not made to anyone who had actively waged war against the rebels. Simon Kollock was on the list of unpardonables [2]. Being an outlaw in the new country, Simon and family had to join with other Loyalists who the British Government transferred to Canada in the summer of 1783. Members of the Loyal American Regiment were granted Crown lands in New Brunswick's Saint John River valley.

   The Kollocks lived in or near Fredericton, New Brunswick, then in 1785 Simon petitioned for land in the northern part of the Miramichi River valley for himself, his sons, and others [3]. By 1786, they were established at Bay du Vin, Northumberland County [4]. Joseph lived with his father at first, but in 1780 petitioned with his brother Jacob for land of their own. Jacob was granted 200 acres at Bay du Vin, but Joseph's petition was left unawarded until he was "of age and ready to improve" [6]. He applied again in 1792, but his petition was deemed "inadmissable" [16].

   I didn't find any certain records for Joseph after 1792. He may have died, or may have left the area.

 8. Elizabeth Kollock [Simon4, Shepherd3, Simon2, Jacob1], daughter of Simon Kollock and Anne Catherine Burton, was born about 1774 probably in Lewes, Sussex Co., Delaware. When the Revolutionary War broke out, and her father Simon declared himself for England, the family moved to New York City. They remained there until 1783, then joined with other Loyalists being taken to Canada. They were given land near Fredericton, New Brunswick.

   It isn't clear if Elizabeth and her mother moved with her father and brothers to Northumberland County, or if they stayed in Fredericton [4]. Elizabeth (and presumably, her mother) were living at Saint John, New Brunswick, as early as 1828 [17], and were there when her mother died in 1845 [18]. In 1851, Elizabeth was living in Saint John, with the widow Jane Halsall, and Jane's family [19][20]. She died 9 February 1861 [21], and was buried in the Church of England Cemetery there. Apparently, she never married.

 9. William Shepard Kollock [Simon4, Shepherd3, Simon2, Jacob1], son of Simon Kollock and Anne Catherine Burton, was born 20 November 1775, probably at Lewes, Sussex Co., Delaware. When, after the Revolution, his Loyalist family was forced to leave the United States for Canada, he stayed with relatives in Delaware [22]. I didn't find any records of his early life. He became a mariner, reportedly "sailing between Lewes and foreign ports" [23]. He married Elizabeth Bagwell, probably ca 1804.

   Elizabeth, daughter of William Bagwell and (probably) Ann Burton [24], was born at Lewes 17 April 1776. She and William lived near Millsboro, Sussex County, and had one child. William died there 25 November 1807, reportedly from the after-effects of being poisoned by his ship's cook [23]. I haven't been able to trace the details of the story. William was buried in the Burton-Bagwell Cemetery at Millsboro.

   Elizabeth did not marry again, after William's death. She continued to live in Sussex County with their son, dying there 19 September 1848, 72 years old. She was buried at Saint Georges Chapel Cemetery, Harbeson, Delaware.

 Child of William Shepard Kollock and Elizabeth Bagwell:

            17. Joseph Kollock (30 September 1805 - 20 August 1872)

 

 NOTES

 1. Turner, C. H. B. 1919. Some Delaware genealogical records. Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 43(3):273-274.

 2. Anonymous. 1797. Laws of the State of Delaware. New Castle, Delaware: Samuel and John Adams.

   Pages 636-643: An Act of Free Pardon and Oblivion, and for other purposes therein mentioned, passed 26 June 1778: recognized that a lot of Americans had sided with the British for various reasons, and gave most of them a chance to swear their loyalty to the new country, except for a number who had actively waged war with the British. "Simon Kollock, junior, cooper" on that list of unpardonables - "If they surrender not themselves to some judge or justice of the peace on or before the first day of August next, and abide their legal trial for such their treason and offenses, shall from henceforth be and is hereby declared to be absolutely forfeited to this state, subject nevertheless to the payment of the said offenders just debts; and all the sales and alienations thereof, and of all and any of the real estate of such offender made after the sixteenth day of May last, by him or any of his agents or attornies (sic), are hereby declared to be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever."

 3. Simon Kollock petitioned twice in 1785 for land in the Miramichi area, once in March on behalf of  10 families, and once in October for himself (mis-identified as "Stephen" Kollock), his two sons Jacob and Joseph, Mary Iann and her son Jacob (probably, Thomas), and Henry Wheeler. From the records at the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, it isn't clear which petition was granted.

 4. Anne Catherine Kollock and her daughter, Elizabeth, may not have moved with Simon and his sons from Fredericton to Bay de Vin. See Chapter Four for details.

 5. Petition of 8 March 1788. Jacob Kollock claims he has no land, and wants Lot 40 north side. Enclosed with petition is an affidavit that says lot 40 has not been improved except for a few trees cut two years ago by Andrew Chip; the said Chip is not in the province. [The endorsement said "Registered to Captain Cheap."]

 6. Petition of Jacob Kollock, Joseph Kollock and Thomas Ian, saying that Jacob is 21, Joseph is 19, and Thomas Ian in 16. They have lived with Captain Kollock but now wish to settle by themselves. They want lots at Bay Devin between Capt. Kollock and Sandy [Gardiner's] Point. Note with petition from Arthur Nicholson says: "Jacob Kollock and Joseph Kollock are Captain Kollock's sons, sober, industrious lads. Thomas Ian is the son of the woman who lives with Captain Kollock. He is a boy of about 16, which is all I know of him." Endorsed: "Jacob Kollock is to have a lot of 200 acres, 6 Nov 1789. Feb. 2, 1790, survey ordered for such of the applicants as are of age and ready to improve.

 7. Hamilton, W. D. 1997. Dictionary of Miramichi biography : biographical sketches of men and women born before 1900 who played a part in public life on the Miramichi, Northumberland County, New Brunswick, Canada. Saint John, New Brunswick: W. D. Hamilton.

   Page 472, information on James Horton family.

 8. Petition of 27 July 1795: Jacob Kollock, of Bay Devin, asks for a timber lot adjoining his present lot on the east side of Captain Kollock near Bay Devin Island. He claims to have made considerable improvement to his land, and his diking his marsh, but is short of timber for fencing; the land he wants on the east side of his present land is not fit for cultivation.  [Request withdrawn when he sold his land.]

 9. Petition of 10 October 1805: Jacob Kollock of Kouchibouguac asks for a piece of wild meadow above Capt. Kollock's upper bounds.

 10. Kollock, J. 1822. Report of the road from Shediac to Miramichi court house. Fredericton, New Brunswick: New Brunswick Provincial Archives.

   Letter of 1 December 1822, Jacob Kollock (road supervisor) to the Governor, describing the progress and condition of the road, the only real road between Miramichi and Halifax. Road work to continue, and no additional money needed, except for bridges (435 pounds).

 11. Gubbins, J.  1980. New Brunswick Journals of 1811 and 1813. Fredericton, New Brunswick: Kings Landing Corporation.

   Several misinterpretations of the Gubbins journals identify Jacob Kollock as commanding officer of the militia at Bay de Chaleur. In July 1813, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Gubbins traveled through Northumberland County, inspecting the various local militias. On the trip, he met and traveled with "Major Collock, the Commanding Officer" at a militia meeting at Richibucto, and they traveled together to Jacob's home at Kouchibouguac. Gubbins went on to Bay de Chaleur, but Kollock did not travel with him..

 12. An 1807 report on the term of the Kent County General Court show Jacob Kollock as representing Richibucto. However, all other records after 1805 in which a location is given cite Carleton Parish, or specifically Kouchibouguac.

 13. Anonymous. 1841-1857. Acts of the General Assembly of Her Majesty's Province of New Brunswick. Fredericton, New Brunswick: J. Simpson.

  In 1841 this notice first appeared: "To Jacob Kollock, a meritous old officer, resident of Carleton, in the County of Kent, the sum of twenty pounds in consideration of his being now totally blind and in the most indigent circumstances." The same appeared in 1842. From 1843 to 1847, the sum was reduced to fifteen pounds, and his blindness was not mentioned, only his indigence. By 1853, the term "destitute circumstances" was being used, but the stipend was still fifteen pounds. By 1854, he was just referred to as "an old soldier of the Revolutionary War" with no condition listed; the stipend was still fifteen pounds. He was recorded in 1855 and 1856, but I didn't find him after that.

 14. Some internet "family trees" give a death date in 1830 for Miriam (Horton) Kollock; the source of the information was not provided. Miriam was alive in January 1838 when she and Jacob transferred land to their grandson, Joseph Power. She was probably "old Mrs. Kolak" who died 11 April 1851. (Raymond, W. 1851. The diary of Washington Raymond. Fredericton, New Brunswick: New Brunswick Archives.}

 15. Jacob Kollock, age 91, shown in the 1861 census in the Carlton Parish household of his son, Joseph Kollock.

 16. Petition of 27 August 1792. Joseph KOLLOCK of Bay Devin settled on a lot opposite Bay Devin Island, no marsh or mowing ground on it, and he has begun to keep a small stock of cattle. Asks for a lot between Lower Bay du Vin and Point Escuminac, with a quantity of marsh. Endorsed: "Inadmissable."

 17. In November 1828, Elizabeth Kollock of Saint John appointed Thomas Lansdown of Richibucto, to handle any business she had in Kent County, and to sell 150 acres of land there, apparently acquired from her father before his death. (No paperwork from Simon Kollock discovered, so far.) Lansdown sold the land 24 August 1830, for £100. [Kent County deeds book, Volume B, pages 523-524 and 528-529.]

 18. Anonymous. 1845. [Ann Catherine Kollock]. New Brunswick Courier (Saint John, New Brunswick), 7 June 1845.

"Died this morning age 97 Ann Catherine, widow of Captain Simon Kollock of the late Loyal American Regt. who emigrated with the Loyalists in 1783. Funeral from her daughter's residence on Dorchester Street [Saint John] half past 4."

 19. Canadian census 1851: Saint John County, Kings and Sydney wards, New Brunswick.

   Eliza "Hollock" (sic), age 76, American; entered Canada 1783; lodger in the home of widow Jane Halsall.

 20. In earlier versions of this report, I had suggested that Jane Halsall was Elizabeth Kollock's sister. This was surmised from apparently erroneous reports that Simon and Anne Catherine Kollock had two daughters. Jane Halsall is believed to be Jane Baker, whom Henry Halsall married in Ontario, Canada, before moving to New Brunswick.

 21. Anonymous. 1861. Death Notice: Kollock. New Brunswick Courier (Saint John, New Brunswick), 9 February 1861.

   "Died this morning, Elizabeth Kollock, age 87, one of the Loyalists who took refuge in this province in 1783."

 22. I couldn't determine who raised William S. Kollock after the rest of his family moved to Canada, nor do I know if he was left when his mother moved to New York in 1777 or when the New Brunswick move occurred in 1783. My speculation is that someone in Anne Catherine's family kept him. There were a number of Burton families in the Lewes area at the time, and later his mother-in-law was also a Burton.

 23. Anonymous. 1899. Biographical and genealogical history of the state of Delaware. Chambersburg, Pennsylvania: J. M. Runk & Co.

   Pp.657-658, biographical information on the Kollock family.

 24. I couldn't find concrete evidence that Ann Burton was Elizabeth Bagwell's mother, but it is likely considering the ongoing connections of the Kollock, Burton and Bagwell families.

 

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