Samuel and Elizabeth McCully of Onslow, Nova Scotia, and their Descendants - Part II


Sanford R. Wilbur

December 2018

 PLEASE NOTE: This is a “work in progress,” not a final report. Therefore, I welcome any comments, questions, corrections, new information, that will make it a better product. I’ll post additional generations as I finish drafting them.

 

CHAPTER TWO

THE SECOND NORTH AMERICAN GENERATION

2. Joseph McCully (Samuel1), son of Samuel McCully and Elizabeth _____, was born in late 1761 or early 1762 [1] at Halifax, Halifax County, Nova Scotia. Probably, he lived his infant years with his parents either at Halifax or in Colchester County. His father died ca 1764, his mother married 2nd Hugh Tackels, and the family then lived at Onslow, Colchester County [2].

   Joseph farmed at Onslow. He, his brother Samuel McCully, and brother-in-law James Clark also fished in the nearby waters of the Bay of Fundy [3] [4]. In 1788, Joseph and Samuel sold their parents' land grant at Londonderry, and purchased land at Onslow from William and Caleb Putnam [5]. 

   On 23 April 1789, Joseph married Mary Upham, half-sister of William and Caleb Putnam. Mary, daughter of Richard Upham and his second wife, Elizabeth (Nurse) Putnam, was born at Wakefield, Middlesex County, Massachusetts ca 1761 [6]. Soon after her birth, the family moved to Nova Scotia, settling first at Halifax, but moving to Onslow later in 1761 or early 1762 [7][8]. Mary spent almost her entire life at Onslow.

   Joseph McCully died 17 March 1810, apparently from an illness that began while he was on militia duty in Halifax in 1807 [9]. He was buried in Onslow Cemetery. Mary continued to live at Onslow, farming with her sons, until her death in November 1834. She was buried at Onslow Cemetery, also.

Children of Joseph McCully and Mary Upham:

            11. Richard Upham McCully (22 May 1790 - 22 June 1815)

            12. William McCully (11 December 1791 - 22 December 1844)

            13. Elizabeth Brown McCully (14 December 1793 - 

            14. Sarah McCully (25 September 1795 - 

            15. Samuel McCully (29 October 1797 - 9 June 1875)

            16. Caleb McCully (30 November 1799 - 28 October 1877)

            17. James McCully (15 March 1803 - 

 

3. Samuel McCully (Samuel1), son of Samuel McCully and Elizabeth _____, was born 6 February 1764, likely in Colchester County, Nova Scotia [2]. His father died ca 1764, his mother married 2nd Hugh Tackels, and the family then lived at Onslow, Colchester County [2].

   Samuel farmed at Onslow. He, his brother Joseph McCully, and brother-in-law James Clark also fished in the nearby waters of the Bay of Fundy [3] [4]. In 1788, Samuel and Joseph sold their parents' land grant at Londonderry, and purchased land at Onslow from William and Caleb Putnam [5].

   At Onslow on 6 February 1794, Samuel married Sarah Hoar. Sarah, daughter of Ebenezer Hoar and Catherine Downing, had been born at Onslow 4 October 1775. Both parents had been born in Massachusetts, and had come to Onslow as children in 1761. Ebenezer was 18 in 1769, and was included as an original grantee at Onslow [10][11].

   By 1796, Samuel and Sarah had moved from Onslow to Hopewell, Westmorland (now, Albert) County, New Brunswick. At the same time, Samuel's mother, his Teakles siblings, and some of Sarah's Hoar relatives moved, also [12] [13]. They lived and farmed in the Hopewell-Hillsborough area until ca 1819, then moved to Sussex, Kings County [14]. They lived at Sussex the rest of their lives, Samuel dying 16 October 1853 [15] and Sara on 15 January 1860 [16]. Both were buried at Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Sussex.

Children of Samuel McCully and Sarah Hoar:

            18. Elizabeth McCully (8 December 1794 - 14 February 1876)

            19. Catherine McCully (13 November 1796 - 6 February 1879)

            20. Mary McCully (11 December 1798 - 20 November 1878)

            21. Sarah McCully (19 November 1800 - 19 April 1894)

            22. Samuel McCully (27 November 1802 - 12 August 1876)

            23. Abigail McCully (29 December 1804 - September 1886)

            24. Ruth McCully (14 January 1807 - 8 February 1871)

            25. Hopeful McCully 8 June 1809 - 24 December 1884)

            26. Lucy McCully (15 November 1811 - 22 July 1816)

            27. Robert S. McCully (8 October 1815 - 18 April 1899)

            28. Lucy McCully (10 August 1821 - 

            

4. Elizabeth McCully (Samuel1), daughter of Samuel McCully and Elizabeth _____, was born ca 1765, likely in Colchester County, Nova Scotia [2]. Her father died shortly before, or shortly after her birth, and her mother married 2nd Hugh Tackels. Then, the family lived at Onslow [2]. Elizabeth lived with her mother, step-father, and McCully and Tackels siblings until her marriage 1 February 1787 to James Clark [17].

   James was reportedly born ca 1760 in Maine. He was a mariner, and may have first settled in Nova Scotia ca 1785 [18]. I was unable to find any other information on his parentage or early life [19]. He was involved in a number of real estate transactions with Elizabeth's brothers, Joseph and Samuel McCully [5][13], and together they operated a significant shad fishery at Economy Point on Cobequid Bay west of Onslow [4][20]. Probably, it was off Economy Point on 22 June 1815 that James and his nephew, Richard McCully, drowned when caught in a severe thunderstorm while fishing [21].

   I couldn't find any certain records of Elizabeth after James' death. A number of their children moved across the Bay of Fundy to New Brunswick, and she may have gone with them. She was only 50 in 1815, so it is even possible she married, again.

Children of James Clark and Elizabeth McCully:

            29. Sarah Clark (19 November 1788 - 

            30. Samuel Clark (15 March 1789 - 19 July 1881)

            31. Isabel Clark (15 September 1790 - 29 January 1872)

            32. Elizabeth Clark (1 December 1791 - 

            33. Olivia Clark (31 August 1792 - 2 August 1887)

            34. Hannah Clark (4 February 1794 - 

            35. Mary Ann Clark (19 April 1795 - 

            36. Lemuel Clark (18 May 1797 - 

            37. Mary Clark (13 December 1799 - 8 August 1849)

            38. Silas Clark (19 August 1802 - 

          

5. Isabella Teakles [22], daughter of Hugh Tackels and Elizabeth (___) McCully, was born 8 May 1768 at Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia [17]. She lived at home until ca 1790, when she married James W. McAlmon. James, son of Robert McAlmon and Elizabeth ____, was born in (Northern?) Ireland ca 1763, and arrived with his parents in Nova Scotia some time before 1770. The family settled in Londonderry Township, Colchester County. By 1791, James was paying taxes on land in both Onslow and Truro, but only in Truro in 1794 and 1795. Presumably, he and Isabella settled in Truro [23][24].

   Apparently, James and Isabella moved their family from Truro to Hopewell, Westmorland County, New Brunswick in 1795 or 1796, in company with many of Isabella's Teakles and McCully relatives [12][25]. In New Brunswick, James continued his profession as a mariner. On one trip, reportedly between Hopewell and Eastport, Maine on 4 January 1822, his ship "Hanabel" was lost at sea, and James and two sons drowned [26].

   Isabella continued to live at Hopewell, dying there 28 (17?) April 1867 [27]. Both Isabella and James have a monument at Mountain View Cemetery, Lower Camp, Albert County, New Brunswick.

Children of James McAlmon and Isabella Teakles [28]:

            39. Hugh T. McAlmon (ca 1791 - 

            40. James S. McAlmon (ca 1792 - 1849)

            41. Robert B. McAlmon (1794 - 4 January 1822)

            42. Elizabeth McAlmon (ca 1796 - 

            43. John McAlmon (ca 1800 - 

            44. William McAlmon (ca 1801 - 22 April 1851)

            45. Joseph McAlmon (1806 - 4 January 1822)

            46. Jane McAlmon (1809 - 1822)

            47. Mary Ann McAlmon?

            48. Isabella McAlmon?

 

6. Mary Ann Teakles [22], daughter of Hugh Tackels and Elizabeth (___) McCully, was born 5 October 1769 at Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia [17]. She lived with her family at Onslow until some time after 1790, when she married Adam Boyd [29]. Adam was probably born in the 1740s, in Massachusetts or New Hampshire. He came to Nova Scotia ca 1761 with pioneers mainly from Rockingham County, New Hampshire, and in 1765 was named a grantee at Truro Township. Apparently, he came to Nova Scotia without family, although he may have been related to Mary (Boyd) Dickey, who came with her husband from New Hampshire [30].

   Some time after 1771, Adam married 1st at Truro, Mary Johnson [31]. Mary, daughter of James Johnson and Elizabeth Patterson, was born 3 April 1749 at Pelham, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and lived there at least through 1753 [32]. She came with her family to Nova Scotia at the same time as Adam, and her father was an original Truro grantee, also. She and Adam continued to live at Truro, where Adam was involved in a number of civic activities [33]. Mary died there 15 May 1790, and was buried at the Robie Street Cemetery [34][35].

   Adam and Mary Ann moved their family from Truro to Hopewell, Westmorland County, New Brunswick in 1795 or 1796, in company with many of Mary Ann's Teakles and McCully relatives [12][13]. They lived at Hopewell until ca 1806, then sold out and moved to the Sussex area, Kings County [36][37]. I haven't been able to trace either Mary Ann or Adam after that.

Children of Adam Boyd and Mary Johnson [38]:

            49. Boyd daughter

            50. Boyd child

Children of Adam Boyd and Mary Ann Teakles [38]:

            51. Boyd child

            52. Boyd child

            53. Boyd child

            54. Boyd child

   

7. William Teakles [22], son of Hugh Tackels and Elizabeth (___) McCully, was born 2 April 1771 at Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia [17]. He lived and farmed in Colchester County until 1795 or 1796, then moved to Hopewell, Westmorland County, New Brunswick, in company with his Teakles and McCully relatives [13]. His mother, Elizabeth, lived with him at Hopewell [38], probably until her death (date undetermined). In 1814, he sold his property at Hopewell, and moved to the Sussex area, Kings County, where many of his Teakles kin had already moved. He purchased more land there in 1815, then in 1818 sold a part of his holdings to his brother, Robert Teakles [39]. I haven’t been able to trace him after that date. Apparently, he never married [40].

          

8. Alexander Teakles [22], son of Hugh Tackels and Elizabeth (___) McCully, was born 13 September 1773 at Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia [17]. He lived and farmed in Colchester County until 1795 or 1796, then moved to Hopewell, Westmorland County, New Brunswick, in company with his Teakles and McCully relatives [13].

   About 1797, Alexander married Agnes Pitt Wheppe [41]. Agnes, daughter of William Wheppe and Ruth Hoar, was born at Onslow 4 January 1777 [17]. Her father died in 1791, and her mother married again in 1793; I assume Agnes lived at Onslow until her marriage, then joined Alexander in Hopewell [42].

   Alexander and Agnes lived and farmed in Westmorland County until 1811, then purchased land in Sussex, Kings County [43]. They remained at Sussex the rest of their lives, in later years living with their son Hugh Teakles and family [44]. Agnes died 25 January 1854; Alexander died 16 February 1856 [45]. Both were buried at Trinity Cemetery, Sussex Corner.

Children of Alexander Teakles and Agnes Wheppe [46]:

            55. Isaac Teakles (1798 – 1860)

            56. William Teakles (1800 – 1875)

            57. Hugh Teakles (1803 – 10 December 1877)

            58. Teakles child (ca 1805 – 

            59. Elizabeth Teakles (17 May 1808 - 7 June 1891)

            60. Alexander Teakles (17 May 1809 – 28 July 1889)

            61. Teakles child (ca 1811 – 

            62. Samuel Teakles (ca 1814 – 1 October 1872) 

            63. Nancy Teakles (1817 – October 1898)

            

9. Robert Teakles [22], son of Hugh Tackels and Elizabeth (___) McCully, was born 2 September 1775 at Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia [17]. He lived and farmed in Colchester County until 1795 or 1796, then moved to Hopewell, Westmorland County, New Brunswick, in company with his Teakles and McCully relatives [13]. About 1802, he married Catherine Spencer.

   Catherine, daughter of William Spencer and Jane Mahon, was born ca February 1785 at Londonderry, Colchester County. Probably, she lived in Colchester County until her marriage, then moved with Robert to Hopewell, New Brunswick [47].

   Robert and Catherine lived and farmed at Hopewell until ca 1818, then moved to Sussex, Kings County, where they purchased land from Robert’s brother, William Teakles [48]. They lived in the Sussex area the rest of their lives, Robert dying there in June 1854 and Catherine 16 November 1865 [49].

Children of Robert Teakles and Catherine Spencer [50]:

            64. Isabella Teakles (1803 – 4 July 1890)

            65 Joseph Teakles (1809 – 

            66. William Spencer Teakles (December 1812 – April 1890)

            67. George Teakles (1814 – 15 April 1896)

            68. Sarah Teakles (1818 – 1907)

            69. James Teakles (1819 – 1905)

            70. John Teakles (1822 – November 1901)

           

10. James Teakles [22], son of Hugh Tackels and Elizabeth (___) McCully, was born 3 June 1777 at Onslow, Colchester County, Nova Scotia [17]. His name is not mentioned in his father's 1792 will, nor could I find any other records of him. I presume he died young.

  

NOTES

 1. Joseph McCully was born within a few months of his parents' arrival in Nova Scotia in October 1761. A birth date of 15 April 1762 has been given on some "family trees," but I could not find the source of the information.

2. Samuel and Elizabeth McCully's children, Samuel and Elizabeth, are assumed to have been born at Onslow, Nova Scotia, but there don't seem to be any certain records. The McCully land grant was in Londonderry Township, Colchester County, but I could not determine how long the family lived at Halifax or if they actually began settlement at Londonderry. Samuel died ca 1764, Elizabeth married 2nd Hugh Tackels ca 1767, after which the family lived on the Tackels land grant in Onslow Township.

3. Land records for Joseph McCully invariably name him as a "yeoman," a farmer working his own land. One biographical note on one of his grandsons, William McCully, identified him as a tailor who lived and worked at Halifax for several years. (Piers, H. 1900. Biographical review, Province of Nova Scotia. Boston, Massachusetts: Biographical Review Publishing Company. Pages 104-105, biographical sketch of William McCully.) Considering the rest of his known history, that seems unlikely. William McCully's maternal grandfather, Thomas Arnold, was a tailor, so one possible explanation is that the family remembrances were confused.

4. Petition of James Clark, William Cutten, Joseph McCully and Samuel McCully, sent from Onslow, Nova Scotia., 4 August 1791. (Record in Nova Scotia Archives, Halifax.)

    The petitioners had for a number of years been employed in the shad fishery, about Five Islands, Economy Point, and such places and had put in great effort to drill holes in the rocks to support a seine against a tidal current of 5 knots, and had built two huts for curing the shad.  In the spring of 1791, their fishing grounds were taken over by other men who had a court order which prevented the petitioners from fishing season on their old grounds.  The petitioners had a license to fish, but it did not state the exact place they occupied, which caused disputes, and they requested a license to occupy the spot which they built on and improved. 

  Disposition of petition: "His Excellency the Lieut-Governor declining giving an further license refers the memorialists to the magistrates of Colchester to make such legal regulations as may be proper and to annex the rule they make with a plan to the licenses already given."  I could not find any further records.

5. A review of the land records of the Nova Scotia Public Archives identified the following actions involving the heirs of Samuel McCully - Joseph, Samuel and Elizabeth McCully of Onslow.

   7 October 1786 - From Elizabeth McCully (spinster, Onslow - Joseph and Samuel's sister) to Joseph and Samuel McCully (yeomen, Onslow) - for £10 - her share of 500 acres in Mass House Village, Londonderry, the original grant of their mother Elizabeth McCully - witnesses Elisha Barton and James McElmon.

  27 December 1788 - From Joseph and Samuel McCully (yeomen, Onslow) to Robert McElhenny (yeoman, Londonderry) - for £85 - 500 acres in Mass House Village, the original grant of their mother Elizabeth McCully - witnesses: William Putnam and Caleb Putnam.

  29 December 1788 - To Joseph and Samuel McCully and James Clark (all of Onslow) from William and Caleb Putnam (Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia) - for £280 - 60 acre lot in Onslow, plus 15,000 acres of backlands and marsh lots - witnesses: Charles Dickson and Elisha Barton.

6. There doesn't appear to be an official birth record for Mary Upham. The town records of Wakefield, Massachusetts, include her baptismal date, which might be close to her birth date. 

7. Richard Upham, as a trader along the coast of New England and Maritime Canada, had been a part-time resident of Halifax, Nova Scotia, since at least 1750, and had property and had built a house there. When he moved his family to Nova Scotia in 1761, they settled at Halifax for a short time, but by late 1761 or early 1762 the family had relocated to the fort at Onslow. There, "Captain" Upham was in charge of opening a road between Halifax and Onslow. (Pages 958-973 in: Campbell, C., and J. F. Smith. 2011. Planters and grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1761-1780. Truro, Nova Scotia: Colchester Historical Society. Volume 2.)

8. The grant for the township of Onslow, Nova Scotia, was officially made 21 February 1769. On the list of grantees, Richard Upham's name was first.

9. Petition of Mary McCulley, Richard McCulley, and William McCulley, 10 February 1815 (Nova Scotia Archives, Halifax) -  Mary, widow of the late Joseph McCulley, claimed that her late husband was born and brought up in Nova Scotia, followed farming as a livelihood, but never received any Crown lands.  He was called to Halifax for militia duty in the winter of 1807, caught a severe cold, was sick about 2 years and then died. He left her a widow with 4 sons and l daughter.  She had supported herself by cultivating 50 acres of land, but hadn't been able to buy the land because of her reduced circumstances. She asked for the land, and also land for her sons William (23 years) and Richard (24 years), who were born and brought up in Onslow, and had never received any Crown lands.

   Disposition of petition:  Land for them was ordered surveyed  24 January 1819.  They re-petitioned, asking that Samuel McCully get the land surveyed for his brother Richard, who was drowned in 1815. The land was granted to them, 1,150 acres in the Old Philadelphia Grant, Halifax County (now, Colchester County).

10. Hoare, D. W. 1976. Digest of ancestry and early history of the Hoar(e) family and the descent of the New Brunswick family from Daniel Hoare of Gloucester, Eng. Saint John, New Brunswick: Saint John Museum. 

   Ebenezer Hoar born 1751 Brimfield, Massachusetts, married 5 January 1775 Catherine Downing; both died 1819; dau. Sarah Hoar born Onslow 4 October 1775.

11. Pages 266-269 and 469-471 in: Campbell, C., and J. F. Smith. 2011. Planters and grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1761-1780. Volume 1.Truro, Nova Scotia: Colchester Historical Society.

12. There is no question that Samuel McCully and various relatives had moved their families from Nova Scotia to New Brunswick by 1796, but the actual time of the move is in question. On a deed dated 1 April 1795, Samuel was identified as living at Hopewell, but two deed in late November 1795 show him as still being a resident of Colchester County, Nova Scotia. We know that his daughter, Elizabeth, was born in Nova Scotia in December 1794; his second daughter, was born in November 1796, apparently (but not positively) in New Brunswick.

13. Land transactions during the move of Samuel McCully from Onslow, Nova Scotia, to Hopewell, New Brunswick.

   1 April 1795 - From Samuel McCully (yeoman, Hopewell) and James Clark (mariner, Onslow) to Joseph McCully (Onslow) - for £10 - some of their lands at Great Marsh, etc. - 60 acres? - witnesses: Daniel McCurdy and James McCurdy.

  1 April 1795 - From Joseph McCully (yeoman, Onslow) and James Clark (mariner, Onslow) to Samuel McCully (yeoman, Hopewell) - some of their joint lands at Great Marsh, etc. - witnesses:  Daniel McCurdy and James McCurdy [Note: it appears this transaction and the one above were meant to separate out their joint holdings so that Samuel, who was leaving Onslow for Hopewell, New Brunswick, could dispose of his property unencumbered.]

   24 November 1795 - To Samuel McCully, Adam Boyd, William Teakles, and Alexander Teakles (yeomen, Colchester County, Nova Scotia) from Thomas and Catharine Dixson (Esq., Hopewell) - for £800 - Hopewell property near the Bay of Fundy between Dixson and Dr. Prince lands - 1,500 acres - witnesses: Robert Dickson and Jonathan Bishop.

  25 November 1795 - To Samuel McCully, Adam Boyd, William Teakles and Alexander Teakles (yeomen, Colchester Co., Nova Scotia) from William and Martha Daniels (yeoman, Hopewell) - for £40 - land in Hopewell near Jonathan Bishop's property and the Daniel land grant - 100 acres - witnesses: Robert Dickson and Jonathan BIishop.

   15 April 1796 - From Samuel McCully (yeoman, Onslow) to James McCurdy (yeoman, Onslow) - £35 - two parcels in Onslow - 36 acres - witnesses: Daniel McCurdy and Nathaniel Marsters.

  15 June 1797 - From Samuel and Sarah McCully (yeoman, Hopewell) to Michael O'Bryan (yeoman, Onslow) - £120, 5 shillings - acreage not given, but apparently all of Samuel's part of the Onslow land bought by Samuel, Joseph, and James Clark in 1788 - witnesses: Patrick Ryan and Joseph McCully.

14. Land transactions in the move of Samuel and Sarah McCully from Hopewell to Sussex, New Brunswick.

    27 December 1814 - From Samuel and Sarah McCully (yeoman, Hopewell) to Paul G. Robinson (yeoman, Hopewell) - £650 - approx. 333 acres in Hopewell - witnesses: Sam Ham___ and Catherine McCully.

   10 March 1818 - To Samuel McCully (farmer, Sussex) from George and Eliza Pittfield (Esq., Sussex) - £740 - 190 acres in Sussex - witnesses: George and Mary Ann Pittfield.

   31 January 1820 - John McCully, Samuel McCully (previously  of Onslow and Hopewell), Samuel McCully Jr., George Hayward, Henry Hayward, William Wallace, and Samuel Phole (?) - all of Sussex - petitioned for Crown lands in Sussex. They stated that none had ever received a grant of crown lands, and asked for lands about 5 miles southwest of Ward (?) Creek, where it crosses the Cumberland Road, about 4 miles from the church in Sussex Vale. (Note: Samuel McCully Sr. was finally granted 50 acres on 29 October 1838.)

15. Anonymous. 1853. [Death: Samuel McCully]. New Brunswick Courier (Saint John, New Brunswick), 5 November 1853.

   "Died in Sussex Vale, Kings County, New Brunswick, on Sunday 16 October 1853, Samuel McCully, age 89."

16.  Anonymous. 1860. (Sarah Hoar McCully death). Religious Intelligencer (Saint John, New Brunswick), 20 January 1860.

   "Died Sussex Vale 15th inst., Sarah, widow of Samuel McCully, age 85."

17. Public Archives of Nova Scotia. 1761-1841. Book of record for births, deaths, and marriages for the Town on Onslow begun in the year 1761. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Public Archives of Nova Scotia.

18. Longworth, I. 1895. A chapter in the history of the township of Onslow, Nova Scotia. Collections of the Nova Scotia Historical Society 9:39-71.

   Page 13: Gravestone of James Clark, Onslow Island Cemetery: "In Memory Captain James Clark, a native of New England District of Maine, who was unfortunately drowned in the Bay of Fundy the 22nd June 1815 in the 55th year of his age, being a freeholder in this township for 30 years."

19. A clue to the origins of James Clark might be found in: Sinnett, C. N. 1907. Jacob Johnson of Harpswell, Maine, and his descendants, east and west. Concord, New Hampshire: Rumford Printing Company.

   "Capt. Isaac Johnson b. Bailey's Island, Me., Nov. 6, 1795... Always resided Bailey's Island, Me.; a very energetic and resourceful captain of fishing vessels. He started in this line of work early in life, going to the Bay of Fundy with Capt. James Clark and with the McCartys of Westport, Me."

   There were Clarks living in and around Harpswell, Maine, at the time of James Clark's birth, but no direct link to him has so far been found.

20. On 9 January 1808, Joshua Marsh purchased from James Clark the land at Economy Point where the Clark-McCully fish house was located. The deed reserved "only to the said James Clark, his heirs and assigns all the privileges of the fishery of any kind whatsoever which was formerly occupied by the said James Clark, William Cuttin Esq., Joseph McCully and Samuel McCully, all of Onslow aforesaid either to build wares (weirs?)) or fish houses or timber or materials growing on said lands to build or repair the same."

21. Anonymous. 1815. Thunder Storm. Acadian Recorder (Halifax, Nova Scotia), 15 July 1815.

      "A severe storm of thunder and rain was felt in Onslow, and the adjacent villages on Thursday the 22d ult. A boat, in which were three men (Messrs. Clark, M'Culloch, and Perkins) fishing in Cobequid bay, upset in a squall, and were all supposed to be drowned, as one of them drifted ashore shortly after."

22. The "Teakles" name is sometimes spelled Tackles or Tackels, sometimes more than one way in the same document. "Tackels" seems to be the form used most often in the earliest publications, so I've used that spelling for the earliest generations. Almost all later records for New Brunswick refer to "Teakles," so I have used that form in later chapters.

23. Pages 649-651 in: Campbell, C., and J. F. Smith. 2011. Planters and grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1761-1780. Volume 2.Truro, Nova Scotia: Colchester Historical Society.

24. Colchester County poll tax records, 1791-1795. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Nova Scotia Archives.

25. James McAlmon purchased land at Hopewell, New Brunswick, from Frederick Babcock in 1797. Westmorland County deed book B-1, page 167.

26. I couldn't find any formal account of the drowning of the McAlmon family members, but their memorial at Mountain View Cemetery, Lower Cape, has some of the story: "In memory of Isabella McAlmon who died April 17th 1847 in the 79th year of her age. James McAlmon her husband in the 59th year of his age, him and two sons who were lost at sea January 4th 1822 in the Schooner Hanabel, Robert B. in the 28th year of his age and Joseph in the 16th year of his age."

27. Anonymous. 1847. (Isabella McAlmon death). New Brunswick Courier (Saint John, New Brunswick), 22 May 1847.

   "d(ied) Hopewell 28th ult., Isabella McAlmon, widow of James McAlmon, age 79."  Note the different death date given in this news item, and on the McAlmon monument (Note 28).

28. This list of McAlmon children is preliminary. There are some obvious errors and disagreements in who is included, and their birth dates. Hopefully, improvements can be made after research on the next generation is completed.

29. No marriage record for Mary Ann Teakles and Adam Boyd has been found. Adam's first wife died in May 1790; the first time Adam's and Mary Ann's names have been found appearing together is on a 28 March 1796 deed, when they sold a tract of land at Truro.

30. At this point, the origin and age of Adam Boyd are speculative. Boyds were among the original proprietors of towns in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, in the early 1700s, having come into the area from Essex County, Massachusetts. Mary (Boyd) Dickey, born in Massachusetts and married at Londonderry, New Hampshire, might have been an aunt. However, I couldn't find any records that definitely tied Adam Boyd to anyone else.

   Adam was named a grantee at Truro in 1765, making him at least 18 at the time. His first wife, Mary Johnson, was born ca 1749, again suggesting a birth date for Adam somewhere in the mid-1740s.

31. I couldn't find any clear indication of when Adam Boyd and Mary Johnson were married. Adam was shown as a single household member in the 1771 Truro census.

32. There are birth records for children of James and Elizabeth (Patterson) Johnson at Pelham, Massachusetts, between 1749 and 1753. I could not find any family information about them between 1754 and 1761.

33. Pages 486-490 and 119-121 in: Campbell, C., and J. F. Smith. 2011. Planters and grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1761-1780. Volume 1. Truro, Nova Scotia: Colchester Historical Society.

34. Mary (Johnson) Boyd's gravestone is clearly readable: "Here lies interr'd the Body of Mary Boyd wife of Adam Boyd who Departed this Life on the 15th day of May 1790 Aged 41 Years." Mary is buried next to her parents, James Johnson (1719-1796) and Elizabeth Patterson (1727-1776).

35. It has been reported incorrectly that Adam Boyd married Eleanor Archibald, daughter of James Archibald and Rebecca Morrison. (Morrison, L. A. 1880. The history of the Morison or Morrison family. Boston, Massachusetts: A. Williams & Co.). A 1796 deed, showing the sale of land by the heirs of James Archibald, identified her as "Elener Tayler," wife of "Samuel Tayler, yeoman."

36On 8 April 1806, Adam Boyd et al were selling land that was part of the original purchase of Thomas Dickson bounded on the south by a highway, on the west by Dr. John Prince lands, and on the east by Samuel McCully lands (New Brunswick Public Archives, Folder 58, Deed #65).

37. Anonymous. 1893. Sketch of Old Shepody. Saint John Daily Sun (Saint John, New Brunswick), 27 March 1893.

   "Mr. Prince who took up the grant bearing his name, did not reside thereon, being located at the Bend, Moncton. The first division of the grant was sold to four men from Onslow, N. S., Mr. Boyd, Robert (sic) McCully, Robert Teakles and William Teakles. The first four mentioned did not remain long in Shepody, but sold out and settled in the 'valley,' Sussex, where their descendants are now. Mr. Spencer came at the same time, but returned to Nova Scotia. Mr. Boyd's name is still used to designate a portion of the Hill marsh, near what is known as Boyd's Creek."

38. The number and probable mothers of Adam Boyd's children are baaed on: Sewell, B. 1979. List of inhabitants, Township of Hopewell, 1803. Generations (New Brunswick Genealogical Society) 1-2(2):20-22 - Adam Boyd - 1 man, 1 woman, 2 children over 10, 4 children under 10.

   So far, I haven't determined the names or ages of any of the children.

39. Kings County Book L-1, pp.260-262: 6 May 1814, Peter and Cynthia Stover, Sussex farmers, for 700 pounds, sold to William Teakles of Hopewell, farmer, 500 acres in Sussex.

   Kings County Book L-1, pp.350-351: 6 May 1814, Peter Stover, Sussex farmer, for 50 pounds, sold to William Teakles, Sussex farmer, 200 acres in Sussex.

   Kings County Book M-1, pp.325-326: 14 September 1815, Peter and Cynthia Stover, Sussex farmers, for 50 pounds, sold to William Teakles, Sussex farmer, 100 acres in Sussex.

   Kings County Book O-1, pp.250-251: 25 November 1818, William Teakles, of Sussex, farmer, for 100 pounds,  sold to Robert Teakles  of Sussex 40 acres (Lot 30) on the Salmon River in Sussex.

40. Several publications have William Teakles marrying Charlotte Snyder. Actually, Charlotte (1809-1841) married the son of William's brother, Alexander - William Teakles (1800-1876).

41. The surname for Alexander Teakles wife has been spelled a variety of ways, Wheppe being the preferred way early, and Whippey coming into common usage later. Agnes has been referred to as Agnes Pitt; Pitt was her grandmother’s surname, and was used as a middle name by a number of family members.

42. I couldn’t find any marriage record for Alexander Teakles and Agnes Wheppe, but “a deed of 1811… confirms her marriage to Alexander Teakles, Shepody NB” (page 989 in: Campbell, C., and J. F. Smith. 2011. Planters and grantees of Cobequid, Nova Scotia, 1761-1780. Volume 2. Truro, Nova Scotia: Colchester Historical Society. Because Agnes’ nearest relatives did not move to New Brunswick with the other Teakles-related families ca 1795, it’s probable that Alexander returned to Onslow for the wedding.

43. Kings County Deed Book K-1, pp. 39-40: 9 February 1811, Martin and Sarah Snider of Sussex, farmer, for 650 pounds, sold to Alexander Teakles of Hopewell, Westmorland County, farmer, 400 acres (in two lots) in Sussex.

44. Canadian national census 1851 – Sussex, Kings County, New Brunswick.

45. Anonymous. 1856. (Alexander Teakles death). Saint John Morning News (Saint John, New Brunswick), 27 February 1856.

   "d. Sussex 16th inst., Alexander Teakles, age 82."

46. An obituary for Alexander Teakles, Jr. (Saint John Daily Telegraph, 16 August 1899): The deceased was a son of the late Alexander Teakles of Sussex who had a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters, of which only two are living.”

   I have yet to identify one daughter one son. The birth years given are just approximations of when children might have been born to the couple.

47. I did not find any specific birth or marriage records for Catherine Spencer. Her birth date is calculated from her age as given in her obituary; Londonderry Township is where most of the Spencers were settled; and her first child was born in 1803.

48. Kings County Deed Book O-1, pp.250-251: 25 November 1818, William Teakles, of Sussex, farmer, for 100 pounds, sold to Robert Teakles of Sussex, 40 acres (Lot 30) on the Salmon River in Sussex.

49. Crandall, D.  1865. (Catherine Teakles death). Christian Visitor (Saint John, New Brunswick). 30 November 1865.

   "d. Sussex 16th inst., Catherine widow of Robert Teakles, age 80 years 9 mos, left eight children, large number of grandchildren. She was baptized by the writer and united with the Baptist Church in Sussex over 20 years past."

50. Catherine Teakles’ obituary stated that she was survived by eight children. So far, I’m only able to account for seven of them.

 

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